Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How to call base class method if it is not abstract.

class WithAbstMethod {
public:
    virtual void do() = 0;
}

class WithImplMethod : public WithAbstMethod {
public:
    virtual void do() {
        // do something
    }
}

template<typename BaseT>
class DerivedClass : BaseT {
public:
    virtual void do() {
        BaseT::do(); // here is a question. How to modify code, so that do() is called if it is not abstract?
        // do something
    }
}

void main() {
    DerivedClass<WithAbstMethod> d1;
    d1.do(); // only DerivedClass::do() should be called
    DerivedClass<WithImplMethod> d2;
    d2.do(); // both WithImplMethod::do() and DerivedClass::do() should be called
}

Is it possible to do this using templates in compile-time without much code (instantiate DerivedClass::do() method with BaseT::do() call and without depending on BaseT type)? Obviously, provide implementation in WithAbstMethod class is not an option. Code above is pseudo-code so may contain minor errors.

share|improve this question
3  
Note that do is a reserved word in C++ :) –  Seth Carnegie Jan 31 '12 at 23:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Actually, providing an implementation for WithAbstMethod::do() might be an option. Abstract functions are allowed to have an implementation.

void WithAbstMethod::do()
{
    // do nothing...
}
share|improve this answer
    
I don't quite understand what do you mean. This method should be abstract by design. So I want compile-time error in such code: void main() { WithAbstMethod a1; } –  cos Jan 31 '12 at 23:57
1  
Well, you should get a compile-time error for void main() already. That aside, if WithAbstMethod::do() is abstract, you still get a compile-time error if you implemented it! Ah - you didn't notice that you can implement abstract members, I guess: you can! struct A { void B() = 0; }; void A::B() {} This is an abstract class A with an implemented abstract function A::B(). This could e.g. be useful in your case. –  Dietmar Kühl Feb 1 '12 at 0:05
1  
The compiler won't let you instantiate an abstract class (in other words, leave the =0 in the function declaration). But, you're still permitted to have an implementation for the abstract function that derived classes can call. For void functions that can work nicely and easily; it might not fit as well if you have abstract functions that would have to return something and there's no sensible 'default'. –  Michael Burr Feb 1 '12 at 0:06
    
Wow, that's probably best answer so far at least because of new knowledge :). However I would still eager to find solution where the call to pure virtual method isn't even compiled. –  cos Feb 1 '12 at 0:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.