Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is a strange problem. I have an iPhone view controller for creating a new user with some text fields that require animation to avoid the keyboard when it is shown, i.e. the view animates up and down to keep a minimum clearance between the top of the keyboard and the lower edge of the text field. That worked fine when it was presented modally from the login existing user screen, the initial view controller in the storyboard.

Then I decided to change the app a bit so that the login/create user views would belong to the same view controller. They transition like so:

if(accountCreateView == nil) {
    UINib *nib = [UINib nibWithNibName:@"NewAccountView" bundle:nil];
    NSArray *nibViews = [nib instantiateWithOwner:self options:nil];
    accountCreateView = [nibViews objectAtIndex:0];
}

[UIView transitionFromView:(displayingLoginView ? loginView : accountCreateView)
                    toView:(displayingLoginView ? accountCreateView : loginView)
                  duration:0.6
                   options:(displayingLoginView ? 
                            UIViewAnimationOptionTransitionFlipFromRight :
                            UIViewAnimationOptionTransitionFlipFromLeft)
                completion:^(BOOL finished) {
                    if (finished) {
                        displayingLoginView = !displayingLoginView;
                    }
                }
];

This works fine too. However the code that does animation of the views does not. When a text field becomes active the code to check proximity of the text field to the keyboard is called but nothing happens when the animation block executes.

So I checked:

if([UIView areAnimationsEnabled])
    NSLog(@"Animations are enabled");
else 
    NSLog(@"Animations are disabled");

Animations are certainly enabled.

So I moved it back further to viewDidLoad, trying a simple animation to see what works, before anything else:

CGRect viewFrame = loginNameTextField.frame;
viewFrame.origin.y = 400.f;
[UIView animateWithDuration:1.f 
                      delay:0.f 
                    options:UIViewAnimationOptionCurveEaseInOut 
                 animations:^ {
                     loginNameTextField.frame = viewFrame;
                 }
                 completion:NULL];

This works fine! Text field moves slowly down the window.

This does nothing, and that is the confusing part:

CGRect viewFrame = self.view.frame;
viewFrame.origin.y = 400.f;
[UIView animateWithDuration:1.f 
                      delay:0.f 
                    options:UIViewAnimationOptionCurveEaseInOut 
                 animations:^ {
                     self.view.frame = viewFrame;
                 }
                 completion:NULL];

viewFrame when set from self.view.frame has origin 0,20 and size 320,460 as expected.

I tried setting the frame property directly:

CGRect viewFrame = self.view.frame;
viewFrame.origin.y = 400.f;
self.view.frame = viewFrame;

Looks like I can change the frame of subviews of self.view but not of self.view. A fix might be to leave the initial view controller as a blank view in the storyboard and create xibs for both the login view and create user view and load them in viewDidLoad - but why?

edit: Yes, switching the storyboard version of the view controller to a plain empty view and adding the view containing the actual UI from a xib as a subview does make animations work again. Still don't know why though.

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

If all you need to do is keep your text fields above your keyboard, why not drop the UIViewController and change to a UITableViewController and use static cells? You place one text field per cell (creating enough cells to meet your needs) and style it how you like. When you don't have a first responder and there are few enough cells to fit on the screen, it won't scroll. It there are more than what will fit, then it will scroll to reach the bottom/top cells. Yet no matter how many cells you have, if you select a text field that will be covered up by the keyboard, the device will automatically scroll the cell to a viewable position. It's all built in and I use this feature all the time. It works with text fields and text views. Just remember to comment out the number of sections, number of rows per section, and the cell for index path methods so the static cells will work correctly. It saves a lot of coding.

HTH

Rob

share|improve this answer
    
It's a good idea and I can see it being convenient with automatic scrolling (or changing the table's frame, then using scrollToRowAtIndexPath) but the view is a little more complex than that which is why I need to just shift the containing view. –  Adam Eberbach Feb 1 '12 at 22:14
    
Ok. I thought I would also add to my post that in some cases it also helps to have a header and footer view in the UITableView. You can place more complicated things in those if it helps. Of course that limits you to placing the tough stuff at the top and bottom of the table view which may not be desired depending on your design. –  Rob Feb 2 '12 at 10:40
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.