Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a column date in table as:

create_table "test", :force => true do |t|
     t.date  "day"
end

I want to set current date as default value for this column. I try as below:

create_table "test", :force => true do |t|
     t.date  "day", :default => Date.today
end

But default always is Feb 1st, so if I create new record tomorrow, the day still is Feb 1st (expect is Feb 2nd)

Thanks for response!

Note: I use sqlite in rails 3

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Rails does not support dynamic default values in migration script. You can easily add them at the model level.

1) Setting default values using after_initialize callback

class Test
  def after_initialize
    self.day ||= Date.today if new_record?
  end
end

t = Test.new
t.day # will return today's date
t.save
t.day # will return today's date

Use this approach only if you need to access the attribute before saving the record. This approach has extra processing cost while loading a query result, as the block has to be executed for every result object.

2) Setting default values using before_validate/before_save callback

class Test
  before_save :init_data
  def init_data
    self.day ||= Date.today if new_record?
  end
end

t = Test.new
t.day # will return nil
t.save
t.day # will return today's date

If the attribute is initialized in before_save the value becomes accessible after save. If the attribute is initialized in before_validate the value becomes accessible in validate callbacks.

3) Using the excellent default_value_for gem

class Test
  default_value_for :day do
    Date.today
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much, it works –  banhbaochay Feb 1 '12 at 9:24

Don't think you can do that in a migration. But, Rails already has a created_at field added to new model migrations that does what you want. And if you need your own attribute doing the same thing, just use a before_save or before_validate to set it if it's nil.

share|improve this answer

Just completing Harish Shetty's answer.
For Rails applications, you must to use this syntax:

  class Test < ActiveRecord::Base
    after_initialize do |test|
      test.day ||= Date.today if new_record?
    end
  end
share|improve this answer

I know that Mysql does not accept a default column type as a function. I am assuming that sqlite would be the same.

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/data-type-defaults.html

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.