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I have a method in java that returns a double number and I want to compare every double number that is returned every time I call the method(say 5 times), so that I can conclude that the number returned is almost the same every time.

How can I do this?

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2  
Can you say more about the context? Are you doing this from a unit test? In that case, one of the assertEquals in JUnit has just such a method for asserting that two doubles are close. –  James Kingsbery Feb 1 '12 at 3:54
    
Thanks everyone for the replies. So yes, I am trying to do a Unit testing, and my method returns the time that some integers are added to an array. I want to test this method with different amounts of integers and compare the times. I guess the ulp() method might work. –  FranXh Feb 1 '12 at 4:00

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You must first decide what "almost the same" means. For example, there's a method in java.lang.Math called ulp() which, given a double, returns the distance between that double and the next; i.e., the smallest possible difference between that number and any other. You might simply compare the difference between the two doubles and the result of calling that method.

On the other hand, maybe you want two numbers to just be within 1% of eachother. In that case, do the same computation, but use the first number multiplied by 0.01 instead of ulp() as the largest acceptable distance.

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Thanks everyone for the replies. So yes, I am trying to do a Unit testing, and my method returns the time that some integers are added to an array. I want to test this method with different amounts of integers and compare the times. I guess the ulp() method might work. –  FranXh Feb 1 '12 at 3:59
public static boolean almostEqual(double a, double b, double eps){
    return Math.abs(a-b)<eps;
}

Where eps is measure of equality.

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I took the liberty of removing an extra ) –  Peter Lawrey Feb 1 '12 at 7:51

It depends on what you mean by similar. If you want to compare two numbers within an absolute error e.g. 1e-6 you can use epsilon. If you want to compare two double regardless of scale. e.g. 1.1e-20 and 1.3e-20 are not similar but 1.1e20 and 1.1e20+1e5 are you can compare the raw value.

public static void main(String... args) throws IOException {
    test(1.1e-20, 1.3e-20);
    test(1.1e20, 1.1e20 + 1e5);
}

private static void test(double a, double b) {
    System.out.println(a + " and " + b + ", similar= " + similarUnscaled(a, b, 10));
}

public static boolean similarUnscaled(double a, double b, long representationDifference) {
    long a2 = Double.doubleToRawLongBits(a);
    long b2 = Double.doubleToRawLongBits(b);
    // avoid overflow in a2 - b2
    return ((a2 >= 0) == (b2 >= 0)) &&
            Math.abs(a2 - b2) <= representationDifference;
}

prints

1.1E-20 and 1.3E-20, similar= false
1.1E20 and 1.100000000000001E20, similar= true
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1  
Careful with the common pattern of comparing a difference to 0 with this. Around 0 it becomes suddenly very sensitive: similarUnscaled(0.69 / 3, 0.23, 10) != similarUnscaled(0.69 / 3 - 0.23, 0, 10) –  georg Nov 10 '13 at 19:39

Approximate equality is defined in terms of the absolute difference: if an absolute difference does not exceed a certain, presumably small, number, then you can say that the values you are comparing are "close enough".

double diff = Math.abs(actual - expected);
if (diff < 1E-7) {
    // Numbers are close enough
}

You must be very careful to not confuse "close enough" end "equals", because the two are fundamentally different: equality is transitive (i.e. a==b and b==c together imply that a==c), while "close enough" is not transitive.

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What does it mean for two doubles to be "approximately equal?" It means that the doubles are within some tolerance of each other. The size of that tolerance, and whether that tolerance is expressed as an absolute number or as a percentage of the two doubles, depends on your application.

For instance, two photos displayed on a photo viewer have approximately the same width in inches if they take up the same number of pixels on the screen, so your tolerance will be an absolute number calculated based on pixel size for your screen. On the other hand, two financial firms' profits are probably "approximately equal" if they are within 0.1% of each other. These are just hypothetical examples, but the point is that it depends on your application.

Now for some implementation. Let's say your application calls for an absolute tolerance. Then you can use

private static final double TOLERANCE = 0.00001;

public static boolean approxEqual(final double d1, final double d2) {
    return Math.abs(d1 - d2) < TOLERANCE;
}

to compare two doubles, and use

approxEqual(d1, d2) && approxEqual(d1, d3) && approxEqual(d1, d4) && approxEqual(d1, d5)

to compare five doubles.

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