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Let's say that we have a table with COLUMN1 and COLUMN 2. Here's a sample of the records:

COLUMN 1 | COLUMN 2
124 | 12
124 | 11
124 | 10
124 | 9
26  | 8
65  | 7
65  | 6
65  | 5
65  | 4
23  | 3
124 | 2
124 | 1
124 | 0

There is absolutely no pattern to this, but what I'd like to do is get:

COUNT(*) | COLUMN 1 | Smallest Column 2
4 | 124 | 9
1 | 26  | 8
4 | 65  | 4
1 | 23  | 3
3 | 124 | 0

So far, I've been doing this with PHP, but I'd like to find a way to do this in MySQL, as I'm sure it'd be a lot more efficient. The problem is, I can't even think of where to start with this. A regular GROUP BY COLUMN 1 wouldn't work because I want two results for 124, since it appears in two different instances. I've been fiddling around for hours and looking into the documentation and Google, but I haven't been able to find anything yet, and I was wondering if any of you would be able to point me in the right direction. Is this even possible with MySQL?

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3  
Is there anything that orders them like that? Without some explicit ordering the table is, more or less, an unordered set; runs of COLUMN1 aren't guaranteed to be the same from one query to the next unless you force the matter using an ORDER BY. –  mu is too short Feb 1 '12 at 6:08
    
If I read the question correctly, the order is column 2 descending. –  nolt2232 Feb 1 '12 at 6:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Well, it took a bit of fiddling, but here it is!

This assumes you have an id column in your table that you order by to get a consistent ordering (if you don't have an id column, order by timestamp or whatever in the inner query).

set @prev := '', @low := 0, @cnt := 0, @grp :=0;
select cnt, column1, low
from (
    select
        column2, 
        @low := if(@prev = column1, least(column2, @low), column2) low,
        @cnt := if(@prev = column1, @cnt + 1, 1) cnt,
        @grp := if(@prev = column1, @grp, @grp + 1) grp,
        @prev := column1 column1
    from (select column1, column2 from so9091342 order by id) x
    order by grp, cnt desc) y
group by grp;

Here's the sql needed to set up a table for testing:

create table so9091342 (id int primary key auto_increment, column1 int, column2 int);
insert into so9091342 (column1, column2) values (124,12),(124,11),(124,10),(124,9),(26,8),(65,7),(65,6),(65,5),(65,4),(23,3),(124,2),(124,1),(124,0);

Output of above query:

+------+---------+------+
| cnt  | column1 | low  |
+------+---------+------+
|    4 |     124 |    9 |
|    1 |      26 |    8 |
|    4 |      65 |    4 |
|    1 |      23 |    3 |
|    3 |     124 |    0 |
+------+---------+------+

p.s. I named the table so9091342 because this is SO question ID #9091342.

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That is awesome. :D Thank you so much, that is perfect. And I've just learned how to make the most of variables. –  Bruno De Barros Feb 2 '12 at 15:39

Interesting question. I know Oracle much better than MySQL so I was able to get it working in Oracle. Might be a better way but this is what I came up with.

select count(col1) as cnt, col1, min(col2) as smallestCol2
from (
  select col1, col2, col2-rnk as rnk
  from 
  (
    select col1, col2, RANK() OVER (PARTITION by col1 order by col2 asc) as rnk
    from tmp_tbl
  )
)
group by col1,rnk
order by min(col2) desc

I'm not quite sure how rank and partition work in MySQL but this might be helpful:

Mysql rank function

EDIT: To clarify what is going on in my query:

The inner query assigns a unique counter (RNK) to each value in column 1. The result of the most inner query is:

COL1 COL2   RNK
23   3      1
26   8      1
65   4      1
65   5      2
65   6      3
65   7      4
124  0      1
124  1      2
124  2      3
124  9      4
124  10     5
124  11     6
124  12     7

By subtracting the rank from column 2, you can get a unique value for each grouping of column 1 values. The result of the second nested query is:

COL1 COL2  RNK
23   3     2
26   8     7
65   4     3
65   5     3
65   6     3
65   7     3
124  0     -1
124  1     -1
124  2     -1
124  9     5
124  10    5
124  11    5
124  12    5

Then you can group on column 1 and that unique value. The final result:

CNT COL1 SMALLESTCOL2
4   124  9
1   26   8
4   65   4
1   23   3
3   124  0
share|improve this answer
    
You, sir, are a genius. I'm quite disappointed that MySQL doesn't have that ranking functionality, but with the use of variables, I'm getting closer to it. I haven't managed to solve it yet, but I'm on it. I'll post the answer here when I'm done. Thank you! :) –  Bruno De Barros Feb 1 '12 at 10:58

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