Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a property in a Model class something like:

    /// <summary>
    /// A list of line items in the receipt
    /// </summary>      
    public ICollection<ReceiptItem> Items { get; set; }

Is there any way I can mark up this property to validate that the collection must have 1 or more members? I am trying to avoid a manual validation function call outside of ModelState.IsValid

share|improve this question
up vote 6 down vote accepted

I ended up solving the problem by using a custom DataAnnotation -- did not think to see if this could be done first!

Here is my code if it helps anyone else!

/// <summary>
/// Require a minimum length, and optionally a maximum length, for any IEnumerable
/// </summary>
sealed public class CollectionMinimumLengthValidationAttribute : ValidationAttribute
{
    const string errorMessage = "{0} must contain at least {1} item(s).";
    const string errorMessageWithMax = "{0} must contain between {1} and {2} item(s).";
        int minLength;
        int? maxLength;          

        public CollectionMinimumLengthValidationAttribute(int min)
        {
            minLength = min;
            maxLength = null;
        }

        public CollectionMinimumLengthValidationAttribute(int min,int max)
        {
            minLength = min;
            maxLength = max;
        }

        //Override default FormatErrorMessage Method  
        public override string FormatErrorMessage(string name)
        {
            if(maxLength != null)
            {
                return string.Format(errorMessageWithMax,name,minLength,maxLength.Value);
            }
            else
            {
                return string.Format(errorMessage, name, minLength);
            }
        }  

    public override bool IsValid(object value)
    {
        IEnumerable<object> list = value as IEnumerable<object>;

        if (list != null && list.Count() >= minLength && (maxLength == null || list.Count() <= maxLength))
        {
            return true;
        }
        else
        {
            return false;
        }
    }
}
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for implementing as a ValidationAttribute, I changed the validation method to account for lists of enums in my model though by using code var list = ((System.Collections.IEnumerable)value).Cast<object>(); - this also meant checking if value was null too – KevD May 30 '12 at 15:08

Implement IValidatableObject interface in your model class and add the custom validation logic in Validate method.

public class MyModel : IValidatableObject
{
    public ICollection<ReceiptItem> Items { get; set; }

    public virtual IEnumerable<ValidationResult> Validate(ValidationContext validationContext)
    {
        if (Items == null || Items.Count() == 0)
        {
            var validationResult = 
             new ValidationResult("One or more items are required") { Members = "Items"};
            return new List<ValidationResult> { validationResult };
        }

        return new List<ValidationResult>();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Question - do normal annotations still validate or do you expressly have to do all validation in that Validate() function now? – Yablargo Feb 1 '12 at 14:04
    
@Yablargo Normal data annotations still works – Eranga Feb 1 '12 at 14:11
    
Thanks for the tips on IValidatable, I ended up doing a DataAnnotation in the end. I really didnt even think to see if I could just create my own, doh! – Yablargo Feb 1 '12 at 14:57

With the EF4 CodeFirst (EntityFramework.dll), you now have MinLengthAttribute and MaxLengthAttribute that you can use on array/list/collection.

Description: Specifies the minimum length of array/string data allowed in a property.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.