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Boxing is when a value type is assigned to an object type. Is it the same when a reference type is assigned to an object?

When a type (which isn't object) is assigned, what happens? Is that boxing too?

    int num=5;
    object obj = num;  //boxing
    //////////////////////
    MyClass my = new MyClass();
    object obj = my; //what is name this convert  (whethere is boxing?)
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Add an example to be more clear. And please check and clean your [Enter] and [Spacebar] keys. –  Henk Holterman Feb 1 '12 at 8:45
    
Like Henk says, all types are objects, and reference types are stored on the heap anyway. –  Jodrell Feb 1 '12 at 8:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I assume you mean something like

string s = "hello";
object x = s;        // no boxing, just implict conversion to base-type.

This works because System.String, like all other classes, derives from System.Object:

public sealed class String : Object { ... }
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thank you henk. –  Mehdi Hadeli Feb 1 '12 at 8:54

Boxing is when a value type is assigned to an object type.

Close. "Boxing" happens when a value of value type is converted to a reference type.

Is it the same when a value of reference type is assigned to a variable of type object?

No. Boxing happens when a value of value type is converted to a reference type. Converting a value of reference type to object is not a boxing conversion, it is a reference conversion.

When a value of reference type (which isn't object) is assigned to a variable of type object, what happens?

A value of reference type is a reference. When a reference is assigned to a variable of type object, a copy of the reference is made in the storage location associated with the variable.

Is that boxing too?

No. Boxing happens when a value of value type is converted to a reference type. Converting a value of reference type to object is not a boxing conversion, it is a reference conversion.

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Boxing is creating an object reference, on the stack, that references a value of the type say for e.g. int, on the heap. But when a reference type (witch isn't object)assigned to object, it is not boxing.

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2  
Why does the reference have to be on the stack? Can't the reference be on the heap, or in a register? –  Eric Lippert Feb 1 '12 at 16:24

Eric's answer corresponds to the CLI (Common Language Infrastructure) standard ECMA-335, partition I (Architecture), chapter 5 (Terms and definitions), which defines boxing as: "The conversion of a value having some value type, to a newly allocated instance of the reference type System.Object.", and unboxing as: "The conversion of a value having type System.Object, whose run-time type is a value type, to a value type instance."

The box and unbox instructions of the CIL (Common Intermediate Language) behave like this, and this is also the meaning usually implied when speaking of boxing/unboxing in the context of C# or VB.NET.

However, the terms boxing and unboxing are sometimes used in a wider/pragmatic sense. For instance, the F# box and unbox operators can do conversions of value types and reference types to and from System.Object:

> let o = box "Hello World";;
val o : obj = "Hello World"
> let s:string = unbox o;;
val s : string = "Hello World"
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