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I recently saw some example code in a WWDC video from an Apple engineer. He was using NSArray's enumerateObjectsUsingBlock: method, but I noticed the first argument to the block was not id as I'm used to, but had been changed to the concrete type that the developer knew was in the array.

For example, I just gave this a go in Xcode and everything works correctly:

NSArray *test = [NSArray arrayWithObjects:@"one", @"two", @"three", nil];
[test enumerateObjectsUsingBlock:^(NSString *aString, NSUInteger idx, BOOL *stop) {
    // ...
}];

The declaration for enumerateObjectsUsingBlock: declares the first block argument to be of type id:

- (void)enumerateObjectsUsingBlock:(void (^)(id obj, NSUInteger idx, BOOL *stop))block

Now I understand that id can be used to represent any objective-c type, but this little trick with arguments was unknown to me.

Is there any documentation for this feature of the language? Can this be used in regular methods where you have an (id)sender argument too? Is this even safe or fully supported?

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In my opinion, that should at least give you a warning. The API is saying it could give you any object type whereas your declaration is saying you only accept a string. –  JeremyP Feb 1 '12 at 9:40
    
I actually tested this with all the warnings you can imagine and everything was reported as OK. –  Mike Weller Feb 1 '12 at 9:42
    
which I think should be a compiler bug, although it occurs to me now that it mirrors the for (... in ...) control statment. –  JeremyP Feb 1 '12 at 10:09

2 Answers 2

Here's a link to apple doc about id type. This trick can be used in any method sending id, and it's safe, as long as you're sure about a type, or check it before you use it.

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Pretty much equal to:

[test enumerateObjectsUsingBlock:^(id obj, NSUInteger idx, BOOL *stop) {
    NSString *aString = (NSString*)obj;
    // ...
}];

Notice that there is a clear parallel in fast-enumerated for loops:

for (id obj in test) {
    NSString *aString = (NSString*)obj;
    // ...
}

vs:

for (NSString *aString in test) {
    // ...
}

No links to the docs, though - sorry!

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