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I have the following fragment of code:

    public static void main(String[] args) throws SQLException {
    Connection c = getConnection();
    long time = System.currentTimeMillis();
    PreparedStatement ps = c.prepareStatement(sqlQuery);
    int index = 1;
    for (String param: parameters) {
        if (isInt(param)) {
            //ps.setInt(index++, Integer.parseInt(param));
            ps.setObject(index++, Integer.parseInt(param), java.sql.Types.NUMERIC , 0);
        } else {
            ps.setString(index++, param);
        }
    }
    displayResult(ps.executeQuery());
    System.out.println("It took " + (System.currentTimeMillis()-time) + ".");

    time = System.currentTimeMillis();
    Statement s = c.createStatement();
    ResultSet rs = s.executeQuery(expandParametersInStatement(sqlQuery, parameters));
    displayResult(rs);
    System.out.println("It took " + (System.currentTimeMillis()-time) + ".");
}

The query executed with a PreparedStatement is slower by a factor of 4000. Compared to the Statement approach. They give the same result and the order of execution makes no huge difference.

Using the setObject() instead of setInt() makes the PreparedStatement as fast as the Statement.

What is the difference? The cast in the Database cannot be that expensive? The data type in the database is a NUMBER(10). I guess it is a matter of the indeces which are used. However, I cannot replicate this in the SQL Developer with CAST(x AS INTEGER)?

Thanks.

The statement is:

private static String sqlQuery = "SELECT sum(value) " +
"FROM a monat, " +
"     n jahr, " +
"     kunde kunde " +
"WHERE monat.kunde_nr IN " +
"    (SELECT DISTINCT kunde.kunde_nr " +
"     FROM MASKE_4_KUNDEN kunde " +
"     WHERE kunde.firma_nr = ? " +
"       AND kunde.verkaufsbereich_nr = ? " +
"       AND kunde.vertriebsbereich_nr BETWEEN (CASE WHEN ? <> -1 THEN ? ELSE -9999999999 END) AND (CASE WHEN ? <> -1 THEN ? ELSE 9999999999 END) " +
"       AND kunde.vertreter_nr BETWEEN (CASE WHEN ? <> -1 THEN ? ELSE -9999999999 END) AND (CASE WHEN ? <> -1 THEN ? ELSE 9999999999 END)" +
"       AND kunde.konzern_nr BETWEEN (CASE WHEN ? <> -1 THEN ? ELSE -9999999999 END) AND (CASE WHEN ? <> -1 THEN ? ELSE 9999999999 END) " +
"       AND kunde.geschaeftsjahr = ? " +
"       AND kunde.kunde_nr BETWEEN (CASE WHEN ? <> -1 THEN ? ELSE -9999999999 END) AND (CASE WHEN ? <> -1 THEN ? ELSE 9999999999 END))" +
"  AND monat.firma_nr = ? " +
"  AND monat.verkaufsbereich_nr = ? " +
"  AND monat.jahr_nr = ? " +
"  AND jahr.kunde_nr = monat.kunde_nr " +
"  AND jahr.firma_nr = monat.firma_nr " +
"  AND jahr.jahr_nr = monat.jahr_nr " +
"  AND jahr.verkaufsbereich_nr = monat.verkaufsbereich_nr " +
"  AND kunde.kunde_nr = monat.kunde_nr " +
"  AND kunde.firma_nr = monat.firma_nr";
share|improve this question
    
Please show us the actual statement – a_horse_with_no_name Feb 1 '12 at 10:11
    
added the query for you. However, this problem is generic and not tied to a specific query. – Felix Feb 1 '12 at 12:54
    
What happens if you execute the same test in a loop and/or if you switch the order of the measurements? – JB Nizet Feb 1 '12 at 13:04
    
Nothing that jumps out immediately. When you say "compared to the Statement" you mean a version that uses literals instead of placeholders? In that case run an explain plan on the statement including the ? and compare that to the explain plan of the statment using literals. – a_horse_with_no_name Feb 1 '12 at 13:09
    
yes with statement I mean a version where I have replaced the ? with the literals. – Felix Feb 1 '12 at 13:21

setInt() method receives int as a second parameter (not Integer). now, I know that auto-boxing should work but apparently it doesn't always work: http://www.coderanch.com/t/550628/JDBC/java/setInt-String-int-Lost My guess is that it didn't work in older versions of JDBC and it works in newer versions but is still buggy... I would try using Integer.intValue() and see if it works any better!

If anyone has more input in regards - I'd love to hear it!

share|improve this answer
    
Integer.parseInt() returns an int (it's also not clear how auto-boxing would make it so much slower). – Dmitri Feb 14 '12 at 22:59
    
@Dmitri parseInt() receives a string as a parameter while intValue works on the Integer itself (which was the option I was referring to). but of course you can use parseInt with the original string param instead of creating an Integer and calling its int-value - your way is more efficient ;) – alfasin Feb 14 '12 at 23:06

We observed the same behavior also with a prepared statement having just setString() statements over an Oracle Database 10.2.0.4.0.

The problem has been completely solved updating the jdbc driver from 10.2.0.3.0 to 10.2.0.4.0

share|improve this answer

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