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I am very new to generics and I am trying to write a simple class which will be generic but also allow sorting of some description on a string member variable.

At the moment I have a basic class but when I try to implement the interface member CompareTo() I get an error at the top telling me it is not implemented. What is the issue here?

using System;

namespace GenericsPracticeConsole.Types
{
    class SortableGenericType<T> : IComparable
    {
        private T t;
        private string stringName;

        public T name
        {
            get { return t; }
            set { t = value; }
        }

        public int CompareTo(SortableGenericType<T> ourObject)
        {
            return stringName.CompareTo(ourObject.stringName);
        }
    }
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

There are two interfaces IComparable and IComparable<U>. IComparable is the older one (that came before generics) which requires instances to be compared with arbitrary objects. IComparable<U> requires instances to be compared with instances of U. If you want to declare that you will compare instances of SortableGenericType on stringName fields this is what you should do:

class SortableGenericType<T> : IComparable<SortableGenericType<T>>
{
   //
}

If you also want to implement IComparable:

   class SortableGenericType<T> : IComparable, IComparable<SortableGenericType<T>> 
   {
      private string stringName;
      public T name { get; set; }

      public int CompareTo(SortableGenericType<T> ourObject)
      {
         //I forgot to add this statement:
         if(ourObject == null) 
             return -1; 
         return stringName.CompareTo(ourObject.stringName);
      }

      public int CompareTo(object obj)
      {
         if (obj.GetType() != GetType())
            return -1;
         return CompareTo(obj as SortableGenericType<T>);
      }
   }

If your class was a collection that is going to hold items of type T and you needed those items to be orderable (this is not what you ask but it is the most common scenario) than you would require T to be IComparable<T> :

   class SomeCollection<T> where T : IComparable<T>
   {
      private List<T> items; 

      private void Sort()
      {
         //
         T item1;
         T item2;
         if(item1.CompareTo(item2) < 0)
         {
            //bla bla
         }
      }
   }
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I wouldn't do if (obj.GetType() != GetType()) return -1;, because then your comparison is no longer antisymmetric or reflexive. –  Porges Feb 1 '12 at 10:53
    
True. But I dont know what I am supposed to do in that case. What would your suggestion be? –  Ali Ferhat Feb 1 '12 at 10:57
    
In your second CompareTo function you use this line: return CompareTo(obj as SortableGenericType<T>); Does this line implicitly compare the current object we have with the one passed without actually referencing the current item in the line? –  CSharpened Feb 1 '12 at 11:10
    
Ok. So my original question was with the line: return CompareTo(obj as SortableGenericType<T>); Does this line basically compare the current object that it was called on to the passed object i.e. myInstance.CompareTo(passedInstance) only without actually specifying this.CompareTo or similar? Sorry to ask again but I like to be clear that I know what is going on before continuing. Thanks for the help. –  CSharpened Feb 1 '12 at 11:43
    
@CSharpened: your suggestion would break if someone implements a subclass SubSortableGType, and passes an argument of type SubSortableGType to CompareTo. But that reminds me that I forgot the case where ourObject might be null, I added a line for that case. Thanks. obj as SortableGenericType<T> casts obj to SortableGenericType<T>, the result is null if unsuccessful, So if you pass an argument of an unrelated type, CompareTo will be called with null and the result will always be "smaller than". Difficult to suggest anything better without knowing more about the the use cases. –  Ali Ferhat Feb 1 '12 at 11:44

IComparable defines the method public int CompareTo(object obj). Note the parameter type - it's object, not your own type. That's why you aren't actually implementing the interface.

What you need to do is implement IComparable<SortableGenericType<T>>

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Perfect. Thanks very much. I assumed that as my type was an object in its own right that it would be ok to do that. Thanks for explaining. –  CSharpened Feb 1 '12 at 10:30
1  
Your type is an object, but it's a specific object. IComparable allows you to compare your object to ANY object, not only to your specific type. –  Avner Shahar-Kashtan Feb 1 '12 at 10:36

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