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How can I check if a std::thread is still running (in a platform independent way)? It lacks a timed_join() method and joinable() is not meant for that.

I thought of locking a mutex with a std::lock_guard in the thread and using the try_lock() method of the mutex to determine if it is still locked (the thread is running), but it seems unnecessarily complex to me.

Do you know a more elegant method? Thanks in advance

Update: To be clear: I want to check if the thread cleanly exited or not. A 'hanging' thread is considered running for this purpose.

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I guess checking if a thread is still running only matters when you expect to wait() for it and, if so, if you haven't wait() 'ed for it yet, he must be running by definition. But this reasoning might be inexact. –  ereOn Feb 1 '12 at 10:48
    
Actually I have a thread that exits on exceptional conditions, and I want to check from the main thread if it is still running, but do not want to wait for (join) it –  kispaljr Feb 1 '12 at 10:55
    
What exactly do you mean by running? Do you mean it is actively processing rather than in a wait state, or do you mean the thread still exists and has not terminated? –  CashCow Feb 1 '12 at 10:58
    
You could always use boost :) –  CashCow Feb 1 '12 at 11:52
2  
You shouldn't have accepted an answer if you weren't satisfied with it. –  Nicol Bolas Feb 1 '12 at 17:16

5 Answers 5

up vote 24 down vote accepted

If you are willing to make use of C++11 std::async and std::future for running your tasks, then you can utilize the wait_for function of std::future to check if the thread is still running in a neat way like this:

#include <future>
#include <thread>
#include <chrono>
#include <iostream>

int main() {
    /* Run some task on new thread. The launch policy std::launch::async
       makes sure that the task is run asynchronously on a new thread. */
    auto future = std::async(std::launch::async, [] {
        std::this_thread::sleep_for(std::chrono::seconds(3));
        return 8;
    });

    // Use wait_for() with zero milliseconds to check thread status.
    auto status = future.wait_for(std::chrono::milliseconds(0));

    // Print status.
    if (status == std::future_status::ready) {
        std::cout << "Thread finished" << std::endl;
    } else {
        std::cout << "Thread still running" << std::endl;
    }

    auto result = future.get(); // Get result.
}

If you must use std::thread then you can use std::promise to get a future object:

#include <future>
#include <thread>
#include <chrono>
#include <iostream>

int main() {
    // Create a promise and get its future.
    std::promise<bool> p;
    auto future = p.get_future();

    // Run some task on a new thread.
    std::thread t([&p] {
        std::this_thread::sleep_for(std::chrono::seconds(3));
        p.set_value(true); // Is done atomically.
    });

    // Get thread status using wait_for as before.
    auto status = future.wait_for(std::chrono::milliseconds(0));

    // Print status.
    if (status == std::future_status::ready) {
        std::cout << "Thread finished" << std::endl;
    } else {
        std::cout << "Thread still running" << std::endl;
    }

    t.join(); // Join thread.
}

Both of these examples will output:

Thread still running

This is of course because the thread status is checked before the task is finished.

But then again, it might be simpler to just do it like others have already mentioned:

#include <thread>
#include <atomic>
#include <chrono>
#include <iostream>

int main() {
    std::atomic<bool> done(false); // Use an atomic flag.

    /* Run some task on a new thread.
       Make sure to set the done flag to true when finished. */
    std::thread t([&done] {
        std::this_thread::sleep_for(std::chrono::seconds(3));
        done = true;
    });

    // Print status.
    if (done) {
        std::cout << "Thread finished" << std::endl;
    } else {
        std::cout << "Thread still running" << std::endl;
    }

    t.join(); // Join thread.
}

Edit:

There's also the std::packaged_task for use with std::thread for a cleaner solution than using std::promise:

#include <future>
#include <thread>
#include <chrono>
#include <iostream>

int main() {
    // Create a packaged_task using some task and get its future.
    std::packaged_task<void()> task([] {
        std::this_thread::sleep_for(std::chrono::seconds(3));
    });
    auto future = task.get_future();

    // Run task on new thread.
    std::thread t(std::move(task));

    // Get thread status using wait_for as before.
    auto status = future.wait_for(std::chrono::milliseconds(0));

    // Print status.
    if (status == std::future_status::ready) {
        // ...
    }

    t.join(); // Join thread.
}
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1  
Nice answer. I would add that it also works with threads without any return value and future<void> –  kispaljr Jun 20 '13 at 8:11
    
What is the reason for this code std::atomic<bool> done(false);? Isn't the bool atomic by default? –  Hi-Angel Aug 7 '14 at 15:16
2  
@YagamyLight In C++ nothing is atomic by default unless it is wrapped in an std::atomic. sizeof(bool) is implementation defined and may be > 1, so it's possible that a partial write can occur. There's also the issue of cache coherence.. –  Snps Aug 7 '14 at 16:17
1  
@YagamyLight More info here: When do I really need to use atomic<bool> instead of bool? –  Snps Aug 7 '14 at 16:23

An easy solution is to have a boolean variable that the thread sets to true on regular intervals, and that is checked and set to false by the thread wanting to know the status. If the variable is false for to long then the thread is no longer considered active.

A more thread-safe way is to have a counter that is increased by the child thread, and the main thread compares the counter to a stored value and if the same after too long time then the child thread is considered not active.

Note however, there is no way in C++11 to actually kill or remove a thread that has hanged.

Edit How to check if a thread has cleanly exited or not: Basically the same technique as described in the first paragraph; Have a boolean variable initialized to false. The last thing the child thread does is set it to true. The main thread can then check that variable, and if true do a join on the child thread without much (if any) blocking.

Edit2 If the thread exits due to an exception, then have two thread "main" functions: The first one have a try-catch inside which it calls the second "real" main thread function. This first main function sets the "have_exited" variable. Something like this:

bool thread_done = false;

void *thread_function(void *arg)
{
    void *res = nullptr;

    try
    {
        res = real_thread_function(arg);
    }
    catch (...)
    {
    }

    thread_done = true;

    return res;
}
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1  
If that is the OP's definition of "running". –  CashCow Feb 1 '12 at 10:57
    
Maybe you misunderstood me. I want to check if a thread has cleanly exited or not. Sorry for the unclear wording. –  kispaljr Feb 1 '12 at 10:59
3  
If different threads are reading and writing thread_done, then this code is broken without a memory barrier. Use std::atomic<bool> instead. –  ildjarn Feb 1 '12 at 19:36
1  
I wasn't referring to multiple worker threads, I was referring to a single worker thread writing to the bool while the main thread reads from it -- this needs a memory barrier. –  ildjarn Feb 2 '12 at 16:43
2  
Check out this question for a discussion why a std::atomic<bool> is necessary here. –  Robert Rüger Jan 26 '13 at 15:41

I'm not sure about std::thread but boost::thread at least has a timed_join() function so if if you pass it with a duration of 0 it will return true if the thread exited and false if it timed out.

So if it returns false your thread is still running.

In what way exactly is joinable() "not meant for that"? As I think my method may simply do the same as joinable() anyway (except returning the opposite).

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Unfortunately std::thread does not have a timed_join method. Actually I wanted to write timed_join() instead of try_join() in the original post, I will correct that –  kispaljr Feb 1 '12 at 10:56
1  
joinable() will return true even after the thread has stopped but has not been joined yet. –  kispaljr Feb 1 '12 at 11:03
    
according to boost, joinable() returns false if there is no thread of execution. Unless std::thread is different (and it seems to be although I have no idea why) it should be the same? Have you tested it? I have always found join() a bad name actually, it should really be wait_for() –  CashCow Feb 1 '12 at 11:51
1  
yes, I tested it with std::thread, and I think boost and STL behaves the same in this respect. "there is no thread of execution" means that the underlying thread has not been created yet, or it has been joined already, but it IS a thread of execution if the thread exited, but was not joined. –  kispaljr Feb 1 '12 at 13:33

Surely have a mutex-wrapped variable initialised to false, that the thread sets to true as the last thing it does before exiting. Is that atomic enough for your needs?

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1  
If you use a mutex anyway, then I feel my solution (using only the mutex, w/o the boolean) to be more elegant. If you absolutely want to use a thread-safe boolean I would recommend std::atomic<bool> instead. In most implementations it will be lock-free. –  kispaljr Feb 1 '12 at 12:36
    
Why lock at all? One thread only ever reads, one only ever writes. And word-size writes are atomic in any case IIRC. –  Xeo Feb 1 '12 at 14:11
1  
@Xeo : The write may be atomic, but a memory barrier is still needed if you expect to see the written value on a different thread (which may be executing on a different CPU). std::atomic<bool> takes care of this for you, which is why it's the real answer IMO. –  ildjarn Feb 1 '12 at 19:37

Create a mutex that the running thread and the calling thread both have access to. When the running thread starts it locks the mutex, and when it ends it unlocks the mutex. To check if the thread is still running, the calling thread calls mutex.try_lock(). The return value of that is the status of the thread. (Just make sure to unlock the mutex if the try_lock worked)

One small problem with this, mutex.try_lock() will return false between the time the thread is created, and when it locks the mutex, but this can be avoided using a slightly more complex method.

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-1 You should not use std::mutex for this kind of signalling (mostly due to reasons how mutex is usually implemented). An atomic_flag works just as well in this case with way less overhead. A std::future might be even better as it expresses the intent more clearly. Also, remember that try_lock may fail spuriously, so the return is not necessarily the status of the thread (although it probably won't hurt you much in this particular case). –  ComicSansMS Jun 19 '13 at 12:18

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