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I want to have a confirmation from the user before they submit a form. This will prevent accidental POSTing of the form, that may be incomplete or incorrect.

Here is my form element:

<form action="manager.php?method=update&id=<?php echo $user->id;?>" onsubmit="return confirm_update();"  method="POST" id="user_update"> 

This calls my function confirm_update()

function confirm_update()
{
  if(confirm("Do you wish to update details?"))
  {
    return 0;
  }
  else
  {
    return 1;
  }
}

The problem with the script is that it does not prevent the form from POSTing if the user clicks Cancel in the JavaScript prompt.

How do I correct this so that the user does not accidently submit their form?

Here is a full description of the feature I am trying to implement:

Use Case - "Update Details"

  • User goes to update page
  • User enters details in form fields
  • User hits submit button
  • Confirmation message appears
  • If "Ok" button selected proceed to submit form
  • Else cancel action and stay on current page
share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Instead of returning 0 and 1, return true and false. You can actually shorten the function to:

function confirm_update() {
    return confirm("Are you sure you want to submit?");
}
share|improve this answer
    
Just checked the above code snippet on my machine. Works for FF9, Chrome. –  Rohan Prabhu Feb 1 '12 at 11:10

Try:


function confirm_update() {
    if(confirm("Do you wish to update details?")) {
        return true;
    }
    else {
        return false;
    }
}

share|improve this answer

I would do an onclick returning false by default, this works for me

<form action="manager.php?method=update&id=<?php echo $user->id;?>"  method="POST" id="user_update"> 
<input type='submit' onclick="return confirm('Do you wish to update details?');return false;"/>
</form>
share|improve this answer

First of all you should reconsider your approach. Instead of asking whether the user wants to submit a potentially incomplete or invalid form, you should use javascript to prevent this from happening, i.e. perform client-side validation using js. What you are doing is inherently done by clicking submit...

If however you want to keep your approach, you have to prevent the submit button from actually submitting the data to the specified action, e.g by changing the form action to "#" via javascript and then trigger the submit if ok was clicked with your js-code, e.g. by using a XmlHttpRequest.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks mahok, however this would not work as the fields already have details within them , as they are a retrieved from the database. Therefore validation would come back true all the time e.g. as there is an email address presen in the email address field. This form lets them change their details on the databse :) –  loosebruce Feb 1 '12 at 11:14
    
Imagine you sign up for a service, but your username is already taken. You might not know and you might have entered a valid username, but on each submit you are returned to the form, with a notification that your name is taken. Not only do you have to submit the form each time this happens, but even worse it asks you whether you want to submit the data... Instead you could check onBlur or onChange if the data is still valid and then present a preliminary validation of the data. –  dbrumann Feb 1 '12 at 11:29
    
Look at this from a user's standpoint. You click on submit, because you want the data to be transmitted. You should only interfer if (and only if) data is obviously missing or invalid. Otherwise you just slow down an already unwanted process (reading the form again and change the incorrect value), which - as with my previous signup-example - will get annoying pretty fast. –  dbrumann Feb 1 '12 at 11:36

You're doing it the other way round!

if(confirm("Do you wish to update details?"))
{
    return 1;
}
else
{
    return 0;
}

Having said that, your code can be shortened to just one line:

return confirm("Hit OK to continue, Cancel to... cancel.");
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