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I've got something like this:

template<int SIZE>
struct bin {
private:
public:
    struct {
        int _value : SIZE;
    };
}

Is it possible to change the datatype of _value depending on SIZE? If SIZE is <= 7, I want _value to be a char. If it is >= 8 and <= 15, I want it to be short and if it is <= 31, I want it to be an integer.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

This isn't especially elegant, but:

template <unsigned int N>
struct best_integer_type {
    typedef best_integer_type<N-1>::type type;
};

template <>
struct best_integer_type<0> {
    typedef char type;
};

template <>
struct best_integer_type<8> {
    typedef short type;
};

template <>
struct best_integer_type<16> {
    typedef int type;
};

template <>
struct best_integer_type<32> {
    // leave out "type" entirely, to provoke errors
};

Then in your class:

typename best_integer_type<SIZE>::type _value;

It doesn't deal with negative numbers for SIZE. Neither does your original code, but your text description says to use char if SIZE <= 7. I expect 0 <= SIZE <= 7 will do.

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thanks, that's exactly what I was looking for. works better than I expected. –  Markus Feb 1 '12 at 12:43
    
At some point you might get concerned about compilation speed. –  edA-qa mort-ora-y Feb 1 '12 at 14:44
    
@edA-qa mort-ora-y: and compilation memory use, and implementations generally impose a fixed maximum "recursion depth" for template instantiation. If we write bin<INT_MAX> b; then something unpleasant will probably happen. But assuming we only use reasonable numbers then the compiler will only ever have to create at most 31 types (per TU), which IMO is unlikely ever to be a significant burden except in a contrived example. I expect there are standard templates that impose overheads a couple of orders of magnitude worse. –  Steve Jessop Feb 1 '12 at 14:58
    
Another way to look at this, is that templates representing TMP functions are automatically memoized -- once an instantiation has been created for a given TU, the compiler can just re-use the result when it's used again. –  Steve Jessop Feb 1 '12 at 15:04

Boost.Integer has utilities for type selection:

boost::int_t<N>::least
The smallest, built-in, signed integral type with at least N bits, including the sign bit. The parameter should be a positive number. A compile-time error results if the parameter is larger than the number of bits in the largest integer type.

boost::int_t<N>::fast
The easiest-to-manipulate, built-in, signed integral type with at least N bits, including the sign bit. The parameter should be a positive number. A compile-time error results if the parameter is larger than the number of bits in the largest integer type.

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1  
I should have known boost had it... –  Matthieu M. Feb 1 '12 at 12:16
1  
@Matthieu: Just missing Boost.Coffee? :) –  Georg Fritzsche Feb 1 '12 at 12:49

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