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I am from OO background and very new to Haskell. In order to print a pattern like:

1 2 3 4 5
1 2 3 4
1 2 3
1 2
1

i made a list

let xs = ["1 2 3 4 5\n"
         ,"1 2 3 4\n"
         ,"1 2 3\n"
         ,"1 2\n"
         ,"1\n"]

But i get the output like

["1 2 3 4 5\n","1 2 3 4\n","1 2 3\n","1 2\n","1\n"]

How can i get the desired output?

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5 Answers 5

To add more built-in goodies:

You don't need to manually produce the lines for a pattern like this:

triangle :: Int -> String
triangle n = unlines . map (unwords . map show) $ [[1 .. k] | k <- [n, n-1 .. 1]]

Prelude> putStr $ triangle 7
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 2 3 4 5 6
1 2 3 4 5
1 2 3 4
1 2 3
1 2
1

import Data.List (intersperse)

triangleOf :: [Char] -> Int -> String
triangleOf chars n = unlines . map (intersperse ' ') $ [take k chars | k <- [n, n-1 .. 1]]

Prelude Data.List> putStr $ triangleOf "Haskell" 7
H a s k e l l
H a s k e l
H a s k e
H a s k
H a s
H a
H

You can get other patterns for example using takeWhile (not . null) (tails chars), there are plenty of variations.

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The short answer is

mapM_ putStr xs

Basically this executes the action putStr for each member of your list. That is, it takes each string in xs and prints it out.

Incidentally, the output you're seeing from show xs is a valid Haskell expression - you could pass it to the read function to recreate xs.

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Do you really mean array? –  Sarah Feb 1 '12 at 12:35
    
@Sarah um, no, cheers. Damn php progamming making me sloppy –  Rob Agar Feb 1 '12 at 12:40
1  
Imperative programmers may find themselves comfortable using forM_, which is equivalent to mapM_ but with the inputs swapped. E.g. forM_ [1..10] print –  Dan Burton Feb 2 '12 at 1:24
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up vote 4 down vote accepted

Just to elaborate a bit, you can do both things together like this:

ghci> putStrLn $ unlines $ ["1 2 3 4 5"
                           ,"1 2 3 4"
                           ,"1 2 3"
                           ,"1 2"
                           ,"1"]

$ has a very low precedence and is right associative so this will behave in the same way as

ghci> (putStrLn (unlines ["1 2 3 4 5"
         ,"1 2 3 4"
         ,"1 2 3"
         ,"1 2"
         ,"1"]))
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2  
Very uncommon to see two $s in one expression: usually this would be written putStrLn . unlines $ [...] –  luqui Feb 1 '12 at 22:19
    
Why not as putStrLn $ unlines [...] ? –  tm1rbrt Feb 5 '12 at 14:48
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You can use the unlines function to turn a list of strings into a single string with '\n' as deliminator. It's like a .join('\n')

unlines ["1", "2", "3"] 

yields

"1\n2\n3\n"

Then you can print it using putStrLn (only prints strings) or print (prints all objects)

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import Data.List

putStr $ unlines $ map (unwords.(map show)) $ reverse $ inits [1..5]
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