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I am looking into the possibility to use SQLite in a Wep app deployed in Tomcat.
Googling I found the following answer SQLite in Tomcat 6 which says:

Unfortunately you cannot create a SQLite Connection pool on Tomcat as SQLite has a database file for each user

I am not sure what does this mean.

Does it mean I can not access the database file concurrently by many parts of my web application?
Or is the implication only on performance?

I am confused here.

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2 Answers 2

SQLite DOES support multiple readers to the same file but only a single writer. A single application CAN create multiple connections to the same database. The question you refer to mentioned that the app wanted to create a separate database for each user and use a single connection pool for all of them. It had nothing to do with accessing the database itself.

SQLite locks databases at the file level which means that a writer will block all readers to the database. You can alleviate this behaviour by using PRAGMA journal_mode = WAL to use a write-ahead log that will allow readers to read data even if a writer is making modifications.

You should check the advantages and disadvantages of write-ahead logging to ensure that you can use it in your web application. At the very least, you need SQLite 3.7+ and your database must reside on the same computer as your web application. This is probably OK for small scenarios.

I'll agree with Tichodroma though, SQLite is not meant for web farms or for hosting on a separate server.

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Does it mean I can not access the database file concurrently by many parts of my web application?

No, you can't. SQLite is not meant to be used in such a scenario.

Take a look at http://sqlite.org/whentouse.html

If you have many client programs accessing a common database over a network, you should consider using a client/server database engine instead of SQLite. SQLite will work over a network filesystem, but because of the latency associated with most network filesystems, performance will not be great. Also, the file locking logic of many network filesystems implementation contains bugs (on both Unix and Windows). If file locking does not work like it should, it might be possible for two or more client programs to modify the same part of the same database at the same time, resulting in database corruption. Because this problem results from bugs in the underlying filesystem implementation, there is nothing SQLite can do to prevent it.

Edit: For Java work I like the H2 Database. It's not SQLite but nice and small, too.

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Very strange statement.It seems to be in contradiction though with the fact that they claim in the same link that SQLite is fine for a medium level web site.Isn't it contradictory? –  Cratylus Feb 1 '12 at 12:33
    
It very much depends on how you connect to the SQLite database. Connection pooling is a way of connecting that is normally used with heavy load sites. –  user647772 Feb 1 '12 at 12:35
    
If you have many client programs accessing a common database over a network, you should consider using a client/server database engine instead of SQLite..A medium level web site doesn't belong in this category? –  Cratylus Feb 1 '12 at 12:37
    
Ask the guys that develop SQLite. –  user647772 Feb 1 '12 at 12:38
    
Sorry, what does this comment mean?That you also agree?Am I missing the point?What? –  Cratylus Feb 1 '12 at 12:41

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