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Hello I would like to define my own class collection, and make it iterable in a foreach statement, just like this :

public class Collection(Type)
{
    ...
    private T head;
    private Collection!(T) queue;
}

Collection!(int) temp;
foreach (int t; temp) { ... }

What methods should I define, and how ?

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3 Answers

you can specify the front, popfront() and empty functions: (but this will consume your collection unless you use save())

public class Collection(T) { ... private T head;  private Collection!(T) queue;

    @property T front(){
        return head;
    }

    @property bool empty(){
        return queue is null;
    }

    void popfront(){
        head = queue.head;
        queue = queue.queue;
    }

    Collection!T save(){
        return new Collection!T(head,queue);
    }

}

or use a dedicated struct for iteration (as is done in the std.container module

public class Collection(T) { ... private T head;  private Collection!(T) queue;

    Range opSlice(){
        return Range(head,queue);
    }

    struct Range{
        T h;
        Collection!(T) q;
        this(T he, Collection!(T) qu){
            h=he;
            q=qu;
        }
        @property T front(){
            return h;
        }

        @property bool empty(){
            return q is null;
        }

        void popfront(){
            h = q.head;
            q= q.queue;
        }

        Collection!T save(){
            return this;
        }


    }
}

so iteration is done like so

Collection!(int) temp; foreach (int t;temp[]) { ... }

you also can add an opApply for the normal foreach:

public int opApply(int delegate(ref T) dg){
    int res=0;
    foreach(ref T;this[]){
        res = dg(t);
        if(res)return res;
    }
    return res;
}
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3  
Use the dedicated struct. A range is different from a container in that it is consumed when iterated, when iterating a container you don't want to be consuming it. Array's are kind of a hybrid... –  he_the_great Feb 1 '12 at 16:25
    
if you don't want it to get consumed use the save function so you get a copy that you can consume without affecting the container –  ratchet freak Feb 1 '12 at 17:43
    
@ratchetfreak It's still bad practice to treat a container like a range. If you pass it to pretty much any range-based function without using save, then your container will be consumed. The proper way to do this is implement opSlice and have it return a range-type for that container. Having your container implement the range functions is just begging for trouble. –  Jonathan M Davis Feb 1 '12 at 17:49
    
I'm not sure why, but ranges have save the standard container definition does not have a save function, though dup is similar. d-programming-language.org/phobos/std_container.html –  he_the_great Feb 1 '12 at 20:38
    
@he_the_great Of course containers don't have save functions. They're not ranges. The containers' ranges have save functions. dup and save do very different things too. dup creates a separate container with separate elements which are equal to what was in the first container but aren't the same elements, whereas save returns a range which points to the exact same elements as the first range. Altering those elements alters the elements in both ranges, whereas altering the elements in a duped container does not alter the elements in the original. –  Jonathan M Davis Feb 1 '12 at 20:54
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Take a look at this documentation on ForeachStatements and scroll down a bit.

If I'm reading your example correctly, you could define an opApply for Collection as follows:

public int opApply(int delegate(ref T) dg){

    Collection!T p = this;

    int res = 0;
    while(!res && p !is null){
        res = dg(p.head);
        p = p.queue;
    }

    return res;
}
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Your Collection class should implement opApply. Your foreach body becomes a delegate to an internal for loop, and you iterate over your internal collection (in your case a queue) using a for loop.

Consider the example given in the docs

class Foo {
    uint array[2];

    int opApply(int delegate(ref uint) dg)    
    { int result = 0;

        for (int i = 0; i < array.length; i++)
        {
            result = dg(array[i]);
            if (result)
                break;
        }
        return result;
    }
}
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