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Found this code in the Spring source. This is the first step where the XML file is converted to Bean Tree.

/** Synchronization monitor for the "refresh" and "destroy" */
    private final Object startupShutdownMonitor = new Object();

public void refresh() throws BeansException, IllegalStateException {
        synchronized (this.startupShutdownMonitor) {
            // Prepare this context for refreshing.
            prepareRefresh();
}
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6 Answers 6

This idiom is used for finer level synchronization. Here is the excerpt from the Java tutorial. You could have used synchronized(this) but that whould have locked on the entire object.

Synchronized statements are also useful for improving concurrency with fine-grained synchronization. Suppose, for example, class MsLunch has two instance fields, c1 and c2, that are never used together. All updates of these fields must be synchronized, but there's no reason to prevent an update of c1 from being interleaved with an update of c2 — and doing so reduces concurrency by creating unnecessary blocking. Instead of using synchronized methods or otherwise using the lock associated with this, we create two objects solely to provide locks.

public class MsLunch {
    private long c1 = 0;
    private long c2 = 0;
    private Object lock1 = new Object();
    private Object lock2 = new Object();

    public void inc1() {
        synchronized(lock1) {
            c1++;
        }
    }

    public void inc2() {
        synchronized(lock2) {
            c2++;
        }
    }
}

Starting Java 5, java introduced Lock abstraction providing more functionality. So, instead of synchronized(obj) you can do something like below. Read more details here

Lock lock = new ReentrantLock();

lock.lock();

c1++;

lock.unlock();
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Thanks for the explanantion. Appreciate it –  mavrav Feb 1 '12 at 12:51
2  
Also synchronizing on this isn't such a great idea for at least one other reasons either: If anyone has a reference to the object they can synchronize on it themselves, which would lead to rather strange behavior. Using a private object avoids that problem too. –  Voo Feb 1 '12 at 13:22
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I can't speak for the Spring authors specifically, but in general...

This is done so that the code is synchronized (obviously) but intentionally not synchronized on this.

Why would we want to do this? There are a couple of reasons

  1. There are other synchronized blocks within the class, but there is no inter-dependencies between those blocks and this one. Therefore they should not be synchronized around the same lock - each resource is synchronized around a different object.
  2. You want to hide the lock from the users of your class. There's always a risk that one of your users might decide to do synchronized(theObject) and end up using the same object as a lock outside your class as you used inside your class. In some cases this could cause serious performance/concurrency issues

Why an Object? Because that's all that's needed in order to get a lock, and anything else would introduce more overhead.

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I assume that fundamentally you're wondering why they didn't use synchronized(this)? There are broadly two reasons why the code you've posted might be better.

  1. Safety (or rather, certainty of behaviour). Since other classes might have a reference to an instance of your class, they are also free to synchronize on it too. (In fact, every time you don't synchronize on this you're almost certainly synchronizing on the monitor of another class). You could write your code such that it works standalone, but creates deadlocks if some other code using it, synchronizes in a particular way. Synchronizing on this is effectively public, but I doubt you'd typically document it (or that another developer would read that documentation). By synchronizing on a private final field like this, you can guarantee that no other code can synchronize on the same object, massiovely simplifying the logic of what you need to protect.
  2. Multiple operations within the same class. If you have two separate counters for example and are using synchronization to prevent lost updates - there's no reason why a write to counter 1 should block a read of counter 2. If everything synchronizes on this, then only one of those methods can ever occur at once. Synchronizing on specific objects lets you create groups of methods/blocks that are mutually exclusive within the group, but don't prevent blocks from another group from proceeding.

The first is arguably the most important, as it can set up a ticking time bomb that can be very difficult to debug. The second is also relevant - and developers often over-constraint independent operations like that without realising - but only applies when you do have multiple groups of operations within the same class.

Nowadays if I'm synchronizing, I'll always do it on a specific new Object() field, even if it's just a single operation for the moment.

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private final Object startupShutdownMonitor = new Object();

public void refresh() throws BeansException, IllegalStateException {
   synchronized (this.startupShutdownMonitor) {
       // Prepare this context for refreshing.
       prepareRefresh();
   }

}

This is equivalent to the following

public void refresh() throws BeansException, IllegalStateException {
      //Do something that does not affect the state of the object
      System.out.println("I am inside the refresh method() and will accquire lock on the object now");
      prepareRefresh();
}

private synchronized void preparedRefresh() {
    //Do something thread safe here
    //Since the thread here has the monitor it can safely alter the state of the class instance here with causing inconsistensy
}

Acquiring a lock on the instance object startupShutdownMonitor is same as acquiring a lock on the instance of the class on which refresh method is being called upon.

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These two pieces of code are not equivalent - the first synchronizes on this.startupShutdownMonitor, but the second synchronizes on this. Since they're different objects they have independent locks. –  Tim Feb 1 '12 at 13:03
    
Tim is right. They are not the same. –  mavrav Feb 2 '12 at 13:15
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Ah I've seen this before :) I've actually pondered the same thing.

This is from AbstractApplicationContext if I remember correctly.

Marking a method as synchronized means that no 2 threads can be calling this method or any other synchronized method at the same time (the lock is on class).

Having a monitor object and using it in a synchronized block like this has the same effect but for all code in synchronized blocks that use the same dummy object.

If I remember correctly as well there is another monitor in this very same class called activeMonitor.

this allows for higher concurrency (threads accessing methods synchronized by both objects at the same time).

this allows keeps him safe from leaking his monitor (which is of no interest to anyone outside his class) out to other objects that might abuse it (place it in a state of eternal dibs), thus messing with his in the process.

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If a piece of code having certain class variables is completely independent from the other, then instead of acquiring a lock on the entire object by using synchronize(this) it is better to use lock on dummy object. The code inside is still protected because the monitor now lies with dummy object lock.

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