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I have instances of a class MyClass, a and b. MyClass has a field Text. I would like to assign an event MyEvent(MyClass target) to b.Selected, such that when fired, this event modifies a.Text. I have some code that looks like this:

void MainMethod() 
{
    var a = new MyClass();
    a.Text = "Foo";

    var b = new MyClass();
    b.Selected += MyEvent(a); // Make the event fire when b is "selected"
}

void MyEvent(MyClass target) {
    target.Text = "Bar";
}

To clarify, my intention is that a's Text will be "Foo", but if b's Selected event fires, it a's Text will become "Bar".

I tried to implement something similar to the above, but it did not work. (VS2010 claimed that MyEvent(a) is an event with a null argument, even though I don't see why a is null.)

I don't understand events very well (I'm trying to learn them) so sorry if this is obvious.

DETAILS:

In practice, I am using a LabelSelectable not MyClass. LabelSelectable extends Control, which is a class for displaying various things such as pictures, buttons and labels on a screen (this is XNA if relevant). Basically in this case, a bunch of these selectable labels can be cycled through with arrows, and if you press Enter when on a given label, its Selected event fires.

I was actually following this tutorial, and you can find the details of the implementation there. (I don't mean to be unhelpful but I'm not sure exactly what parts are relevant and what are not, and if I put everything here, it would be a lot of code.)

As far as I can see, "MyClass" looks something like this:

MyClass 
{
    public event EventHandler Selected;

    public string Text
    {
        get { return text; }
        set { text = value; }
    }

    void OnSelected(EventArgs e)
    {
        if (Selected != null)
        {
            Selected(this, e);
        }
    }
}

I can get the equivalent of the below code to work, by the way:

void MainMethod() 
{
    var a = new MyClass();
    a.Text = "Foo";

    var b = new MyClass();
    b.Selected += MyEvent; // Make the event fire when b is "selected"
}

void MyEvent(object sender, EventArgs e) {
    Console.WriteLine("Event fired!");
}

It would output stuff to the console when b is Selected.

share|improve this question
1  
Please show the definition of MyClass, especially of the event. – Daniel Hilgarth Feb 1 '12 at 13:09
    
Nitpick - MyEvent in your code is an event handler, not an event. – Oded Feb 1 '12 at 13:09
    
What does MyClass decend from? Is it a visual component and is the .Selected property something implemented in its ancestor - something whose event needs a Sender and some form of EventArgs? – J... Feb 1 '12 at 13:13
    
Hope this helps. – Superbest Feb 1 '12 at 13:33
1  
In your first example you shouldn't specify (a) when subscribing to the event, you're just telling it which handler to invoke when it does, a should be passed as an argument when firing Selected. i.e. b.Selected += MyEvent (as per your last example) and then to fire, Selected(a);. – Grant Thomas Feb 1 '12 at 13:35
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You shouldn't be placing parameters in your event handler declaration.

b.Selected += MyEvent(a); // Make the event fire when b is "selected"

should just be

b.Selected += MyEvent; // Make the event fire when b is "selected"

Either MyClass should be responsible for passing the value of target to the invocation of Selected or you must rely on the MyEvent method itself to determine which object to modify.

It may be adventageous to follow a standard eventing pattern where the source of the event is passed in as a parameter to the event handler:

void MyEvent(object sender, EventArgs e) {
    var source = sender as MyClass;

    var target = /* do something here to find the target based on the sender */ 

    target.Text = "Bar"; 
} 
share|improve this answer
    
Can you explain the "do something here" part please? – Superbest Feb 1 '12 at 13:42
    
I don't know how the instances of your MyClass objects relate in practice. If your code is exactly as you show it, only having instances a and b, then you could simply make b a private member of the class that contains you handler MyEvent (private MyClass _b;) and then in your MyEvent method simply use _b instead of target. If you have many of these relationships, you can create a private member of type Dictionary<MyClass,MyClass> (called _dictionary below) that defines the mappings, adding the source/target pairs to that. Then in MyEvent do: var target = _dictionary[source]. – roken Feb 1 '12 at 13:53
    
You could also use the Tag property of your labels to hold the reference to the control you wish to update the text of when it is clicked. In MainMethod(): a.Tag = b; In MyEvent: var target = source.Tag as MyClass; Again, the approach you take is completely dependent on the relationship of your 'b' instance you are updating and the 'a' instance(s) that are the stimuli for the change. – roken Feb 1 '12 at 13:58
    
Thanks, I used the Tag method and was able to get it to work. – Superbest Feb 1 '12 at 16:09

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