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The Setup: I currently have a page with a GridView control on it inside of an update panel, using a SqlDataSource. I have a timer setup to update the GridView every X amount of seconds. Typically for what I am testing every time the GridView updates about 4-5 new rows of data are added to the gridview, while the last 4-5 get tossed out. I am only displaying 15 results at a time and will have new results coming in every update.

The Problem: I allow the user to select the rows, while the GridView is being updated. I am handling this by setting the SelectedIndex property. However, when I select a row and then the grid is updated the row the user selected gets pushed down about 4-5 rows and the data in the previous selected index is selected instead. So where they clicked is selected at this point, not what they clicked.

I need a way to determine, if possible from the SqlDataSource/Gridview, how many new rows have been added to the gridview. OR a way to maintain the selected data by the data in the row and not just the SelectedIndex.

Any help is appreciated, thanks.

RESOLVED: Ok I went ahead and added a new invisible column to my grid, and am now keep track of the unique ID's selected from the DB. By setting an array before databinding, and comparing that to the new array I get after databinding I was able to use a simple Intersect to determine the number of rows that are the same. Then I used that to determine from the total how many are new this postback.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Just an idea:

I think you can use an invisible column (more specifically an ID column) to store the selected rows' IDs value in the Session object and then after the grid updates, you can retrieve this value(s) and select the row(s) again if they are still present.

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Hmm..I see. Yes that would work, but it seems in my scenario that it could be a lot of processing. Also I was wondering if there was a way to determine how many rows that were databound were new, this could help greatly because then I wouldn't have to search through all of the rows again for that ID that may or may not be there. –  user1048281 Feb 1 '12 at 13:56
    
How many rows are you expecting in the grid? I don't think this would require a lot of processing... they're only numbers and the search would run really fast. –  Leniel Macaferi Feb 1 '12 at 14:05
1  
Ok I went ahead and added a new invisible column to my grid, and am now keep track of the unique ID's selected from the DB. By setting an array before databinding, and comparing that to the new array I get after databinding I was able to use a simple Intersect to determine the number of rows that are the same. Then I used that to determine from the total how many are new this postback. –  user1048281 Feb 1 '12 at 15:20
    
That's it. A nice solution for the problem. I've done something like this about 2 years ago just for the record. :) –  Leniel Macaferi Feb 1 '12 at 15:26

If you have custom GridView OnRowUpdating event.

public void GridView_RowUpdating(object sender, GridViewUpdateEventArgs e)
{
    Session["CurrIndex"] = GridView.SelectedIndex;//index before insertion
    Session["RowCount"] = GridView.Rows.Count;//row count before insertion
    //Add new Rows
    GridView.SelectedIndex = (Int32)(Session["CurrIndex"]) + ( GridView.Rows.Count - (Int32)(Session["RowCount"]);//update selected index
    Session["CurrIndex"] = GridView.SelectedIndex;//restore the index into session
}  
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Thanks for the suggestion. I am doing something similar now, but please note that this event happens when the user is updating a row not when a row is being databound/added. –  user1048281 Feb 1 '12 at 15:21

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