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#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

template<typename T>
T max(T lhs, T rhs)
{
  return lhs < rhs ? rhs : lhs;
}
template<>
int max<int>(int lhs, int rhs)
{
  return lhs < rhs ? rhs : lhs;
}

int main()
{
  cout << max<int>(4, 5) << endl;

}

~/Documents/C++/boost $ g++ -o testSTL testSTL.cpp -Wall
testSTL.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
testSTL.cpp:18:24: error: call of overloaded ‘max(int, int)’ is ambiguous
testSTL.cpp:11:5: note: candidates are: T max(T, T) [with T = int]
/usr/include/c++/4.5/bits/stl_algobase.h:209:5: note:                 const _Tp& std::max(const _Tp&, const _Tp&) [with _Tp = int]

How do I correct this error?

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3  
Remove the using namespace std; –  Mr Lister Feb 1 '12 at 14:32
    
@RichardJ.RossIII Perhaps not an english native speaker? –  BЈовић Feb 1 '12 at 14:32
3  
@Richard: Because English isn't the first language for many of us. –  Armen Tsirunyan Feb 1 '12 at 14:32
1  
@VJovic: That's no excuse. At the same time the rest of the English used was learned, the proper way to ask a question could have been. I don't understand where anyone, native English speaker or not, would get the idea that "how to correct this error" is magically a valid question construct. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 1 '12 at 14:32
4  
@RichardJ.RossIII: Not everybody on this site is a native english speaker and it can be difficult to sense the real meaning of an expression. At least the final goal is reached: you understood what he asked. :) –  ereOn Feb 1 '12 at 14:33
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6 Answers 6

up vote 17 down vote accepted

It's all because of your using namespace std;. Remove that line. By that using-directive, you bring std::max (which must be somehow included via iostream) into the global scope. Therefore the compiler doesn't know which max to call - ::max or std::max.

I hope this example will be a good scarecrow for those who think that using directives come at no cost. Weird errors are one side effect.

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It's worth noting ADL side-effects of not using them though. :-D Ex: no one writes std::cout.operator<<("hello world!").operator<<(std::endl); even though that is required for defined behavior without using declarations/directives, as ADL is not standardized across compilers. Sutter has a whole section on this on why using directives should be encouraged in C++ Coding Standards because of the undefined behaviors that result from inadvertently depending on ADL. –  stinky472 Feb 1 '12 at 14:47
2  
@stinky472: ADL is standard. Compilers not supporting it should be thrown away. –  Armen Tsirunyan Feb 1 '12 at 14:51
1  
@stinky472: Sutter has lots of sections in lots of books about why not do this or that, because while it is standard, msvc doesnt work properly with it. This is all driven by FUD and the pressure should be put on the compiler people to fix their stuff instead of programmers to use fugly workarounds. ADL works fine in the major open source compilers btw. –  PlasmaHH Feb 1 '12 at 15:00
1  
@LightnessRacesinOrbit: Of course not. ADL was invented primarily because of the issues with operators, so it's perfectly OK to rely on ADL. –  Armen Tsirunyan Feb 1 '12 at 15:05
2  
@stinky472: ADL rules are well-defined in the C++ standard and they are far less complicated than rules of, say, overload resolution or template point of intantiation. I think not relying on ADL is a bad practice, rather than the reverse –  Armen Tsirunyan Feb 1 '12 at 15:06
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I guess the compiler can't work out whether to use std::max or your max, because you've got a using namespace std; and both your max and the std::max fit the bill

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You're colliding with std::max(). Rename it to something else like mymax and it will work.

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3  
Even better to not define it in std namespace, like Armen mentioned. –  FatalError Feb 1 '12 at 14:34
3  
The OP never defined it in std namespace. I advised against bringing all the names of std namespace into the global scope –  Armen Tsirunyan Feb 1 '12 at 14:42
    
The whole point of putting the standard library in std namespace is so you can define your own max function in some other namespace (or globally), or in general, don't have to constantly think which names are used in the standard (or any other) library. What's the point of namespaces in the first place, if you don't employ them to resolve naming collisions and keep doing with prefixes instead?! –  UncleBens Feb 1 '12 at 16:06
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You have both your max and std::max. The compiler doesn't know which one you intended to call.

You can tell it by calling ::max(4,5) or std::max(4,5), or - even better - not have using namespace std in the file.

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That's because there's already std::max template function defined. Remove the 'using namespace std' and add 'std::' where needed., or use '::max'.

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The problem is that there is already a function named 'max' defined by std. To fix this, rename your function to something else, like this:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

template<typename T>
T mymax(T lhs, T rhs)
{
    return lhs < rhs ? rhs : lhs;
}
template<>
int mymax<int>(int lhs, int rhs)
{
    return lhs < rhs ? rhs : lhs;
}

int main()
{
    cout << mymax<int>(4, 5) << endl;

    return 0;
}
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And stop using using namespace std –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 1 '12 at 14:41
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