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My understanding was that python strings are immutable.

I tried the following code:

a = "Dog" 
b = "eats"
c = "treats"

print a, b, c
# Dog eats treats
print a + " " + b + " " + c
# Dog eats treats
print a
# Dog
a = a + " " + b + " " + c
print a
# Dog eats treats
# !!!

Shouldn't python prevented the assignment? I am probably missing something.

Any idea?

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16  
The string itself is immutable but the label can change. –  mitch Feb 1 '12 at 14:58
2  
Assigning a new value to an existing variable is perfectly valid. Python does not have constants. This is independent from data type mutability. –  Felix Kling Feb 1 '12 at 15:00
2  
You may want to take a look at the id() function. a will have a different id before and after the assignment, indicating that it is pointing at different objects. Likewise with code like b = a you'll find that a and b will have the same id, indicating they're referencing the same object. –  DRH Feb 1 '12 at 15:03
1  
    
The link from delnan is exactly what I was refering to. –  mitch Feb 1 '12 at 16:47

9 Answers 9

up vote 36 down vote accepted

First a pointed to the string "Dog". Then you changed the variable a to point at a new string "Dog eats treats". You didn't actually mutate the string "Dog". Strings are immutable, variables can point at whatever they want.

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The string objects themselves are immutable.

The variable, a, which points to the string, is mutable.

Consider:

a = "Foo"
# a now points to "Foo"
b = a
# b points to the same "Foo" that a points to
a = a + a
# a points to the new string "FooFoo", but b still points to the old "Foo"

print a
print b
# Outputs:

# FooFoo
# Foo

# Observe that b hasn't changed, even though a has.
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@jason try the same kind of operations with lists (that are mutable) to see the difference a.append(3) corresponds to a = a + "Foo" –  jimifiki Feb 1 '12 at 15:20
1  
@jimifiki a.append(3) is not the same as a = a + 3. It's not even a += 3 (inplace addition is equivalent to .extend, not to .append). –  delnan Feb 1 '12 at 15:34
    
@delnan and so, what? For the sake of showing that strings and lists behave differently you can assume that a = a+"Foo" is the same as a.append(something). In any case it's not the same. Obviously. Were you happier reading a.extend([something]) instead of a.append(something)? I don't see that big difference in this context. But probably I'm missing something. Thruth depends on context –  jimifiki Feb 1 '12 at 16:24
    
@jimifiki: What are you talking about? + behaves the same for lists and strings - it concatenates by creates a new copy and not mutating either operand. –  delnan Feb 1 '12 at 16:25
    
@delnan A=[0,1,2];B=A;A.append(3); print A,B ; a = "012"; b = a ; a = a + "3"; print a,b; I guess I misunderstood you –  jimifiki Feb 1 '12 at 17:25

A variable is just a label pointing to an object. The object is immutable, but you can make the label point to a completely different object if you want to.

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The variable a is pointing at the object "Dog". It's best to think of the variable in Python as a tag. You can move the tag to different objects which is what you did when you changed a = "dog" to a = "dog eats treats".

However, immutability refers to the object, not the tag.


If you tried a[1] = 'z' to make "dog" into "dzg", you would get the error:

TypeError: 'str' object does not support item assignment" 

because strings don't support item assignment, thus they are immutable.

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l = [1,2,3]
print id(l)
l.append(4)
print id(l) #object l is the same

a = "dog"
print id(a)
a = "cat"
print id(a) #object a is a new object, previous one is deleted
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The statement a = a + " " + b + " " + c can be broken down based upon pointers.

a + " " says give me what a points to, which can't be changed, and add " " to my current working set.

memory:

working_set = "Dog "
a = "Dog" 
b = "eats"
c = "treats"

+ b says give me what b points to, which can't be changed, and add it to current working set.

memory:

working_set = "Dog eats"
a = "Dog" 
b = "eats"
c = "treats"

+ " " + c says add " " to the current set. Then give me what c points to, which can't be changed, and add it to current working set. memory:

working_set = "Dog eats treats"
a = "Dog" 
b = "eats"
c = "treats"

Finally, a = says set my pointer to point to the resulting set.

memory:

a = "Dog eats treats"
b = "eats"
c = "treats"

"Dog" is reclaimed, because no more pointers connect to it's chunk of memory. We never modified the memory section "Dog" resided in, which is what is meant by immutable. However, we can change which labels, if any, point to that section of memory.

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There is a difference between data and the label it is associated with. For example when you do

a = "dog"

the data "dog" is created and put under the label a. The label can change but what is in the memory won't. The data "dog" will still exist in memory (until the garbage collector deletes it) after you do

a = "cat"

In your programm a now ^points to^ "cat" but the string "dog" hasn't changed.

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Python strings are immutable. However, a is not a string: it is a variable with a string value. You can't mutate the string, but can change what value of the variable to a new string.

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summarizing:

a = 3
b = a
a = 3+2
print b
# 5 

'not immutable'

a = 'OOP'
b = a
a = 'p'+a
print b
# OOP 

'immutable'

a = [1,2,3]
b = range(len(a))
for i in range(len(a)):
    b[i] = a[i]+1

this is an error in python 3 because 'immutable'.
and not an error in python 2 because clearly 'not immutable'.

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