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Question is in the title:

I have gathered that the Big-Oh is

O(n3).

As that would represent the highest degree of the polynomial. And the worst case time complexity.

By contridiction dose Big-Omega mean lowest degree? i.e

Ω(n2)

if that is the case, how can we justify disregarding the 3rd degree?

Thanks

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1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

No. Big-O does not really say what the biggest degree is; that's just a quick rule - and Big-Omega does not say what the lowest degree is. O and Omega are really tools for comparing two functions, not for saying something about one function.

When we say that f = O(g), it means that the function f does not grow faster than g (when constant factors are disregarded). So 17n^2 + 5n^3 = O(n^3), but it is also the case that 17n^2 + 5n^3 = O(n^4), 17n^2 + 5n^3 = O(n^5), and 17n^2 + 5n^3 = O(18036523n^38576) - but it is not the case that 17n^2 + 5n^3 = O(n^2.9999999).

When we say that f = Omega(g), it means that the function f does not grow slower than g (when constant factors are disregarded). So 17n^2 + 5n^3 = Omega(n^3), and 17n^2 + 5n^3 = O(n^2), and 17n^2 + 5n^3 = O(n), and 17n^2 + 5n^3 = O(1), but it is not the case that 17n^2 + 5n^3 = O(n^3.000001).

So if you want a quick rule, it is that f = O(g) if the highest degree of f is <= the highest degree of g, and f = Omega(g) if the highest degree of f is >= the highest degree of g.

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So you could say that F = Ω(n2) because f cannot grow slower then n^2. In this case, it would be correct to says that anything less then ^3 would also be correct. But, as a general guild line we take the first degree below the MAX degree? –  Special--k Feb 1 '12 at 15:52
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@Special--k: Anything less than or equal to n^3 is correct, and one generally prefers a so-called "tight bound", which is to use the greatest degree. So the preferred answers are actually O(n^3) and Omega(n^3). –  Aasmund Eldhuset Feb 1 '12 at 16:03

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