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I just tried to implement Singleton pattern to WinForms ,so that only one instance of a form stays in the Application life ,but i face a difficulty

I want to throw exception if the instance of singleton exists and return same instance reference at the same time.

SingletonForm.cs

public class SingletonForm : BaseFormcs
{
    private static SingletonForm _instance;
    //To stop new keyword from instantiation 
    private SingletonForm()
    { }
    public static SingletonForm GetInstance()
    {
        if (_instance == null)
            return _instance = new SingletonForm();

        else
        {
            throw new Exception("Form already exists"); // execution returns from here
            return _instance; // Warning : Unreachable code detected
            //I also want to return instance reference.
        }

    }
}
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3  
why would you want to throw an exception in that case? That doesn't make much sense to me at all. –  BrokenGlass Feb 1 '12 at 15:55
2  
Please note that your singleton implementation is not thread safe. –  Daniel Mann Feb 1 '12 at 15:56
1  
The question hardly warrants an answer as it seems to be a very poor practice but you can use an out parameter. public static SingletonForm GetInstance(out Exception ex) { } –  Lloyd Feb 1 '12 at 15:57
    
@BrokenGlass: i just thought may be sometime i may need to use both at the same time thats why I asked, i was just playing with this singleton sample... –  dotNetSoldier Feb 1 '12 at 16:11
    
@DBM: Got your point ,thanks –  dotNetSoldier Feb 1 '12 at 16:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You either throw an Exception, or return an instance. In the case of a Singleton, no Exception should be thrown, just return the instance if it exists.

The Singleton pattern shouldn't stop you (or even warn you) from calling GetInstance many times. It should just return the same instance that was created the first time around.

i just thought may be sometime i may need to use both at the same time thats why I asked

Throwing an exception returns immediately from the function, because it means that an unexpected error occurs. In another situation, you might want to throw an exception, but only if some condition is true (e.g. argument validation failed). Otherwise, you return a value. Here's an example:

public int SomeFunction(String someArgument)
{
    if (someArgument == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("someArgument");
    int retVal = 0;
    //Some code here
    return retVal;
}
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"no Exception should be thrown, just return the instance if it exists." ok.. –  dotNetSoldier Feb 1 '12 at 16:10
    
I added some general advice about using "both at the same time". –  Meta-Knight Feb 1 '12 at 16:29
    
Thanks for that.. Kindly also check my Question 2 –  dotNetSoldier Feb 1 '12 at 17:24
    
You should ask a new StackOverflow question for your question 2, so more people will see it and be able to answer. I think Singleton can be inheritable for testing purposes, but otherwise you wouldn't inherit from a Singleton usually. –  Meta-Knight Feb 1 '12 at 17:30
    
Ok new question posted at stackoverflow.com/questions/9100523/… –  dotNetSoldier Feb 1 '12 at 17:39

From a design standpoint, no, you don't. An exception should represent a serious, unanticipated error from which your system needs to recover. You're talking about using it as an error code. If you're going to do that, don't throw an exception -- indicate a problem by setting a flag on your singleton or returning a null or something.

However, in your specific case, just get rid of the exception logic. The singleton design pattern is intended to be a repository for global variables, so it is expected that the public static instance will be called more than once (in fact, many users of singleton tend to use it in just about every class in their code base).

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"indicate a problem by setting a flag on your singleton" elaborate this point please –  dotNetSoldier Feb 1 '12 at 16:13
1  
Meaning, instead of throwing exceptions, you can keep a static instance counter variable that you increment each time someone calls GetInstance(). Expose a static boolean property on the Singleton called TooManyAccesses or something and set it to true if instance counter is more than one. Something along those lines. –  Erik Dietrich Feb 1 '12 at 16:23

I'm working on the assumption that you have a case where you actually need to know whether it's a new instance, and that it's going to change your execution path following the return. One way is (though I shudder to type this) using exceptions (option 1). But it's more likely that you'd want to use option 2 to simply branch on the return value.

public class SingletonForm : BaseFormcs
{
    private static SingletonForm _instance;
    //To stop new keyword from instantiation 
    private SingletonForm()
    { }
    // ------- Option #1
    // Use an OUT parameter for the instance, so it's set before the exception
    public static void GetInstance(out SingletonForm form)
    {
        if (_instance == null)
        {
            _instance = new SingletonForm();
            form = _instance;
            return;
        }
        form = _instance;
        throw new Exception("Form already exists"); // execution returns from here
        // return isn't needed, since you threw an exception.
        // You really, really shouldn't do this. Consider instead...
    }

    // -------- Option #2
    // Same as above, but the return value tells you whether it's shiny and new
    public static bool GetInstance(out SingletonForm form)
    {
        if (_instance == null)
        {
            _instance = new SingletonForm();
            form = _instance;
            return true; // yes, you created a new one
        }
        form = _instance;
        return false; // no, you used an extant one
    }
}

This second option is probably your best bet, since it's more along the lines of what you'd see in Dictionary.TryGetValue(KEY key, out VALUE value).

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Thanks for the input... :-) –  dotNetSoldier Feb 1 '12 at 17:41

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