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Please explain what exactly the difference of $_ and @_ is in Perl. When to use which, given by example code.

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3  
Is there something in perldoc perlvar you did not understand? –  runrig Feb 1 '12 at 15:57
4  
See the manual –  Quentin Feb 1 '12 at 15:57
    
yes, RTFM, I know ;) –  organic-mashup Feb 1 '12 at 16:23
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4 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

When in a subroutine, the array @_ gives the arguments passed to the given subroutine. For example:

use strict;
use warnings;

sub print_em
{
  foreach my $arg (@_)
  {
    print "You passed in $arg.\n";
  }
}

print_em("foo","bar","baz");

The output is

You passed in foo.
You passed in bar.
You passed in baz.

The scalar $_ is usually used as a variable within a loop. For example:

use strict;
use warnings;

# Note that we are not declaring a variable
# that takes on the values 1 through 5.
foreach(1..5) 
{
  print "$_\n";
}

The output is:

1
2
3
4
5

Likewise, we could have slightly rewritten the subroutine print_em above as

sub print_em
{
  foreach(@_)
  {
    print "You passed in $_.\n";
  }
}

or even as the more compact

sub print_em{ print "You passed in $_.\n" foreach(@_);}

The variable $_ can also be used as a "default argument" for certain functions. For example:

use strict;
use warnings;

$_="foobar";

if(/bar/) #We do not have to write $_=~/bar/
{
  print "matched!\n";
}

which, of course, outputs matched!.

Take a look at perldoc perlvar for more information on these and Perl's other "magic variables".

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as a perl beginner, the part that confused me is that $_ is described as the default input and pattern searching space and below there are functions listed that uses $_ as default argument: abs, alarm, chomp, chop, chr, chroot, cos, defined, eval, exp, glob, hex, int, lc, lcfirst, length, log, lstat, mkdir, oct, ord, pos, print, quotemeta, readlink, readpipe, ref, require, reverse (in scalar context only), rmdir, sin, split (on its second argument), sqrt, stat, study, uc, ucfirst, unlink, unpack. –  organic-mashup Feb 1 '12 at 16:25
    
You can write chomp($var) for example. Or just chomp() without an argument. If the latter is the case, chomp() will do it on $_. But just a beginner tip. Don't use "$_" at all expect map, grep or something else where you don't have another choice. –  Sid Burn Feb 6 '12 at 8:42
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Jack Maney's reply covers your exact question, but I also wanted to note something: you shouldn't be fooled by just the name portion of the variable. The sigal matters, as well. $_ and @_ are totally different variables, as are $foo and @foo, and also $bar and %bar. Perl stores them completely separate from each other.

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+1: A very good point. This is also a good reason to avoid explicit declaration of typeglobs, mostly because you no longer need them. –  Jack Maney Feb 1 '12 at 16:09
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One commonly seen example had to do with I/O. This code...

while(<>)
{
  chomp;
  print if(m/^chr1/);
}

...is functionally equivalent to this code.

while(my $line = <STDIN>)
{
  chomp($line);
  print($line) if($line =~ m/^chr1/);
}

Any time you have a loop the $_ variable is populated, but there is also a more explicit syntax. This code...

foreach(@a)
{
  print;
  chomp;
  push(@b, $_)
}

...is functionally equivalent to this code.

foreach my $value(@a)
{
  print($value);
  chomp($value);
  push(@b, $value);
}

One thing to keep in mind with $_ and other magic variables is that they can be quite cryptic to a novel programmer. Over time, I have used these less and less in favor of more explicit syntax that (hopefully) makes it easier for others to understand the intent of the code.

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1  
after reading foreach(@a) { print; chomp; push(@b, $_) } the first thing I thought was: "I HATE PERL" then I read further foreach my $value(@a) { print($value); chomp($value); push(@b, $value); } does the same, since then I thought: "I LOVE perl!" :-) –  organic-mashup Feb 1 '12 at 16:48
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Neither $_ nor @_ is inherently special. Aside from being global, they are completely normal variables. They are not magical. Nothing special happens when one assign to them or reads from them.

The reason @_ is used so often is Perl places the arguments of the function. If you want to get the args passed to your sub, you'll need to access @_.

 sub f {
    my ($x, $y) = @_;
    ...
 }

The reason $_ is used so often is that some Perl operators assign to it by default, and others use its value as a default for their argument. It can lead to shorter code if you embrace it, but you never have to use it.

for my $x (@x) { say $x; }
   vs
for (@x) { say; }
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1  
Errr, something very special indeed happens when you assign to @_ in a subroutine, eg: sub addX { $_[0] .= 'X' } my $foo='foo'; addX($foo); print $foo; # :-) –  tadmc Feb 1 '12 at 22:48
    
@tadmc, I'm quite aware that sub calls uses existing scalars for the elements of @_ instead of making new ones. This is called aliasing, and it can be done with any variables, not just the elements of @_. e.g. $y=4; for $x ($y) { $x=5; } say $y;. Having two names for one variable doesn't make the variable special. It's actually very common. (Ever import a sub?) –  ikegami Feb 2 '12 at 1:20
    
@ikegami => Except for the fact that in normal usage (letting perl assign to them) both @_ and $_ usually contain aliases, which is definitely a "special" behavior. So yes, something special will normally happen when you assign to them. –  Eric Strom Feb 2 '12 at 1:22
    
@Eric Strom, $_ is only aliased by for $_. If $_ is special because you can do for $_, then so is $x. By your argument, every scalar is special. But we know that's false (by definition), so the argument is invalid. –  ikegami Feb 2 '12 at 1:27
    
@ikegami => $x and every other scalar can be special, but usually are not. $_ and @_ usually are special by default. Saying otherwise is very misleading. You also seem to have conveniently forgotten about map and grep which non-optionally alias to $_ –  Eric Strom Feb 2 '12 at 1:31
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