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I'm working on an iPhone tweak where I need to read from and modify the contents of a struct. However, the struct definition is different between iOS 4.1, iOS 4.2, and iOS 5, and I would like to retain compatibility with all of these. The problem is not that I can't do it; the problem is that it doesn't make sense to me to have to rewrite 100+ completely-identical lines of code for each iOS update that happens to change the struct.

Rather than get too involved by actually posting the source from project without any context, I wrote up a simplified example problem. It is a bit too lengthy to include in this post, so I placed it on Pastie here: http://pastie.org/3295629 All the details of the problem are included as comments in that Pastie.

Thanks in advance for any help you might have. I'm totally stumped.

(If you want to see the actual structs I'm dealing with in the iOS project: http://pastie.org/3296564)

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3  
It might actually help if you told us what the original struct is. We might be able to help you solve your original problem more easily than the contrived problem you invented. (Or we might not.) –  Dietrich Epp Feb 1 '12 at 15:58
    
I just edited the question and added a link to the structs. –  n00neimp0rtant Feb 1 '12 at 16:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Sounds like you should hide access to the struct behind an interface. The 100+ lines piece of code you're talking about shouldn't use the real struct directly, but the interface.

eg if the two different versions are like:

struct foo_v1 {
    int a;
    int b;
    long long c;
};

struct foo_v2 {
    int a;
    char x;
    int d;
};

You wrap an interface around this that has:

struct abstract_foo {
    int version;
    int a;
    int b;
    long long c;        
    char x;
    int d;
};

struct astract_foo get_foo(void);
void set_foo(struct abstract_foo f);

The get_foo() and set_foo() copy between the original struct into your interface struct and back respectively. The version field is set to either 1 or 2, so the code using this struct can decide what fields to use.

This example uses a copy of the struct. This is simple and works for simple structures (like file information). You could also design an interface struct that uses pointers instead of copied values, like:

struct abstract_foo {
    int version;
    int *a;
    int *b;
    long long *c;        
    char *x;
    int *d;
};

These are just examples, there are a million ways to make abstractions in C.

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This is very interesting. I'm going to try implementing this. –  n00neimp0rtant Feb 1 '12 at 16:21

I'm not familiar with iOS development but it seems like the most natural way would be to compile three different executables, one for each version of iOS. The struct should be defined in some header file provided by iOS, but if it's not then you could use #ifdefs to figure out which version of iOS you are compiling for and define it yourself.

#if IOS == 4_1
typedef struct osdata {
int dengus, payness, fibbus;
} mydata;
#elsif IOS == 4_2
typedef struct osdata {
int dengus, payness, chonus, fibbus;
} mydata;
#endif

If this isn't possible for some reason (e.g. Apple requires one executable for all OSes), then you have to do something more complicated. I think I would make my own struct called mydata that I can work with in most of my source code. When I need to interact with the OS, I would have a few different functions that converts it to the right stream of bytes to be recognized by that particular version of the OS, or to convert it from the OS's struct to my struct. By doing this you abstract away differences in the OS and make it so you can just work with one data structure in most of your code.

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The cleanest way is possibly to use a function pointer. The functions (one for each version) receive a void* pointer (and probably more) and cast that pointer to the appropriate struct, and do their stuff. A smart union is also a possibility.

Avoiding function pointers, you could also do something like

switch (ver=get_version()) {
case 1: return do_version_1_stuff(ptr, 1,2,3);
case 2: return do_version_2_stuff(ptr, 1,2,3);
case 3: return do_version_3_stuff(ptr, 1,2,3);
default: fprintf(stderr, "Unknown version %d, call QC!\n", ver);
       return -1;
}

UPDATE: ("smart union" does not seem to be well defined)

A smart union is a union of types (in most cases structs), that serve the same purpose but have more_or_less similar layout. The union contains a type-member, which is shared by all the union-members and should be used to select the appropriate member.

struct aaaa {
    int type;
    float value;
    };

struct bbbb {
    int type;
    float value;
    char *description;
    };

union a_or_b {
   struct aaaa a;
   struct bbbb b;
   };

If the members don't share a common first type field, the type field can be put outside of the union in a wrapper-struct:

struct kkkk {
    float value;
    };
struct llll {
    float value;
    char *description;
    };

struct k_or_l {
   int type;
   union {
       struct kkkk k;
       struct llll l;
       } u;
   };

union a_or_b *abp;
struct k_or_l *klp;

Reference to the stuff in the union will now go via abp->a.value or klp->u.k.value, eg

int value = abp->a.type==1 ?  abp->a.value : abp->b.value;

or ,even better, using a switch (abp->type) {}.

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...But you don't explain what a "smart union" is... –  Dietrich Epp Feb 1 '12 at 16:09
    
Google will probably know what a "smart union" is. –  wildplasser Feb 1 '12 at 16:13
2  
I did a Google search for smart union and found no links relevant to programming. –  Dietrich Epp Feb 1 '12 at 16:14
    
GIYF: "smart union algorithm". On second thought, smart union does not fit in nicely, because the struct layouts are different, and thus the structs cannot be overlaid. –  wildplasser Feb 1 '12 at 16:21
    
Now I find results for computing the union of sets, which is completely unrelated. –  Dietrich Epp Feb 1 '12 at 16:24

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