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How do I pass arguments to a public class in C#. I am new to C#, so please forgive the n00b question.

Given this sample class:

public class DoSomething
{
    public static void  Main(System.String[] args)
    {

        System.String apple = args[0];
        System.String orange = args[1];
        System.String banana = args[2];
        System.String peach = args[3];

        // do something
    }
}

How do I pass the requested arguments?

I would expect to write something like:

DoSomething ds = new DoSomething();
ds.apple = "pie";

But this fails.

share|improve this question
    
Have you declared an "apple" variable in your DoSomething class? –  Joachim Isaksson Feb 1 '12 at 17:16
    
The method you are using public static void Main(System.String[] args) is usually used for accepting command line arguements. –  m4tt1mus Feb 1 '12 at 17:23
    
To help you move your Googling along, you are looking to set a property's value on a class, not to pass a class a parameter (which, outside of a constructor, doesn't make sense - class methods get supplied variables, not the class itself). –  48klocs Feb 1 '12 at 17:25
    
if you want to use class than take main method out and create properties for apple orange banana and so forth.. –  AJP Feb 1 '12 at 17:28
    
@mmcglynn: Side note - you don't "pass arguments to a class" in C# (not even sure in what language you can do so), but rather "pass arguments to a method", where method is either static method of some class like DoSomething.Main("string_arg") or just member of a class myInstance.Method(42). –  Alexei Levenkov Feb 1 '12 at 17:49

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The String[] args parameter of the Main method is populated when you launch the application via command line:

/your/application/path/DoSomething.exe arg1 arg2 arg3 ...

If you want to pass these arguments programmatically you have to set your variables as public Properties, so for example:

public class DoSomething
{
   public string Apple {get;set;}
   public string Orange {get;set;}
   public string Banana {get;set;}
   // other fruits...
}

Then you can do:

public class Test
{
    public static void  Main(System.String[] args)
    {
        DoSomething ds = new DoSomething();
        ds.Apple = "pie";

        // do something
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This works. All are right, this was a class intended the console. I am re-purposing it in my limited way for a webpage, so I appreciate all of the help. –  mmcglynn Feb 1 '12 at 19:04

First, let's hit your version with notes, then move on to what you probably wanted.

// Here you declare your DoSomething class
public class DoSomething
{
    // now you're defining a static function called Main
    // This function isn't associated with any specific instance
    // of your class. You can invoke it just from the type,
    // like: DoSomething.Main(...)
    public static void Main(System.String[] args)
    {
        // Here, you declare some variables that are only in scope
        // during the Main function, and assign them values 
        System.String apple = args[0];
        System.String orange = args[1];
        System.String banana = args[2];
        System.String peach = args[3];
    }
        // at this point, the fruit variables are all out of scope - they
        // aren't members of your class, just variables in this function.

    // There are no variables out here in your class definition
    // There isn't a constructor for your class, so only the
    // default public one is available: DoSomething()
}

Here's what you probably wanted for your class definition:

public class DoSomething
{
    // The properties of the class.
    public string Apple; 
    public string Orange;

    // A constructor with no parameters
    public DoSomething()
    {
    }

    // A constructor that takes parameter to set the properties
    public DoSomething(string apple, string orange)
    {
        Apple = apple;
        Orange = orange;
    }

}

And then you could create / manipulate the class like the following. In each case, the instance will end up with Apple = "foo" and Orange = "bar"

DoSomething X = new DoSomething("foo", "bar");

DoSomething Y = new DoSomething();
Y.Apple = "foo";
Y.Orange = "bar";

DoSomething Z = new DoSomething()
{
    Apple = "foo",
    Orange = "bar"
};
share|improve this answer

Use a public property, you can use an auto-implemented property to start with:

public class DoSomething
{
   public string Apple {get;set;}
}
share|improve this answer

Constructor:

public class DoSomething
{
    public DoSomething(String mystring) { ... }

    static void Main(String[] args) {
        new DoSomething(args[0]);
    }
}

Edit

Noticed that the C# online book is in german language. But i'm sure that there are english books too.

share|improve this answer

In the example you provided, the variables you're creating are scoped within the Main method; they are not class-level variables.

You could access them by making them members of the class, as follows:

My original code snippet was wrong; your Main method was static, so you can't access instance variables.

public class DoSomething 
{ 
    public string apple;

    public void Main(System.String[] args) 
    { 
         apple = args[0];
    } 
} 
share|improve this answer
    
You can't if there is no instance... Edit: Actually your code is wrong right now... –  Felix K. Feb 1 '12 at 17:17

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