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Just trying to understand this better. I know this is because of Deffered Execution

But what is it causing the method not getting called immediately. This is from EduLinq from JonSkeet.

 public static partial class Enumerable
{
    public static IEnumerable<TSource> Where<TSource>(
        this IEnumerable<TSource> source,
        Func<TSource, bool> predicate)
    {
        if (source == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("source");
        }
        if (predicate == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("predicate");
        }

        foreach (TSource item in source)
        {
            if (predicate(item))
            {
                yield return item;
            }
        }
    }
}

This is where I am using it.

List<int> list = new List<int>() { 1, 3, 4, 2, 8, 1 };

var s = list.Where(x => x > 4);

var result = s.ToList();

My question is though Where is a static method on IEnumerable why is it not called on list.where(). But it is called on s.ToList().

I have a breakpoint on Enumerable.Where() it is not hit on s = list.Where(x => x > 4) but the breakpoint is hit on s.ToList()

After I saw the comment from YUCK Why does LINQ have deferred execution? I am adding this to the question.

Please let me know.

share|improve this question
    
Why do you say that it is not being called? the Where function will be called and return an IEnumerable. It won't start applying those conditions until you look at s and get values from it but the Where method will have run... –  Chris Feb 1 '12 at 17:40
    
It seems like this question boils down to Why does LINQ have deferred execution? –  Yuck Feb 1 '12 at 17:40
1  
Just think of what s actually represents. Would you ask the same question if you instead used foreach (var a in s) { ... }? –  Jason Down Feb 1 '12 at 17:43

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The Where method is actually called, but it returns an IEnumerable<T>. This return value is actually a class the compiler implements for you.

Note that your implementation uses an iterator (it includes yield return ...). When this occurs, the compiler changes your method around so that it creates a compiler-generated class, and, as you actually iterate through the IEnumerable<T>, the code you wrote gets executed.

The first time MoveNext is called, the code up to your first yield return will get executed. The second call will go until the next, etc.

Calling ToList() enumerates through the entire IEnumerable<T>, which in turn executes your entire method.

Also - ToList() isn't required here to have your code execute. You could use a foreach loop:

foreach(var val in s) 
{
     // Do something...
}

Or even execute the calls manually:

IEnumerable<int> s = list.Where(x => x > 4);
IEnumerator<int> sEnumerator = s.GetEnumerator(); // Get the enumerator

// This section will cause your code to run, but only until the *first* yield statement...
if (sEnumerator.MoveNext())
{
    int val = sEnumerator.Current();
}

// Without further MoveNext() calls, you won't "finish" the foreach loop...

// This block will do one more "loop" in your foreach, going until the next "yield" (or the end of the method)
if (sEnumerator.MoveNext())
{
    int val = sEnumerator.Current();
}
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for the explanation of yield return. –  cadrell0 Feb 1 '12 at 17:43

LINQ uses delayed execution, the method will be called when you actually request the data.

If you use ToList() you request the data immediately thus enumerating the list right away.

share|improve this answer

You answered your own question- because of deferred execution (kind of). Where is being called, it's the filtering itself that is deferred.

List.Where does not return the filtered list. It returns an IEnumerable<int>, which when iterated filters the list. Your call to .ToList() performs the iteration, resulting in the filter being executed.

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