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A Singleton should be inheritable or They should not be ?

According to Gof "when the sole instance should be extensible by subclassing, and clients should be able to use an extended instance without modifying their code."

but then why do i see Sealed and Private constructor examples on MSDN

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what's your reason for using a singleton? Try not to. –  Adrian Feb 1 '12 at 17:41
2  
read singleton tag wiki. stackoverflow.com/tags/singleton/info –  Kaipa M Sarma Feb 1 '12 at 17:43
    
@Adrian: Well i think if i don't Seal the singleton class a junior programmer might inherit it and may break the singleton pattern resulting in multiple instantiation of the childclass Singleton,That's why it should be Sealed. –  dotNetSoldier Feb 1 '12 at 17:47
    
But then i see Gof "instance should be extensible by subclassing". –  dotNetSoldier Feb 1 '12 at 17:49
1  
"If you want to use inheritance in conjunction with the singleton pattern, you should put the inheritable state and behaviour into an abstract base class and define the singletons as (final) subclasses." taken from stackoverflow.com/questions/2573492/… –  dotNetSoldier Feb 1 '12 at 17:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In my projects I use an Ambient Context implementation from Mark Seemanns book Dependency Injection in .NET. The main point of use of that pattern is that always when you are asking for Current instance, there has to be something and also Context can be switched by other implementation. F.E.

public class TimeContext
{
    private static TimeContext _instance;

    public static TimeContext Current
    {
        get
        {
            if (_instance == null)
            {
                _instance = new DefaultContext();
            }
            return _instance;
        }
        set
        {
            if (value != null)
            {
                _instance = value;
            }
        }
    }
    public abstract DateTime GetDateTime();
}

and concrete implementation of context should be like

public class DefaultContext : TimeContext
{
    public DateTime GetDateTime()
    {
        returm DateTime.Now();
    }

}
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F.E == Means What ? –  dotNetSoldier Mar 5 '12 at 17:05
    
You mean put the object creation code in base class –  dotNetSoldier Mar 5 '12 at 17:06
1  
f.e.- for example; not just put the default creation to avoid get nullable object and it is also good for unit testing when you want to mock default implementation with setter –  Ivan Mar 5 '12 at 18:10
    
Thanks for increasing my Vocabulary "Ambient Context" and "Dependencey Injection" were new to me :) –  dotNetSoldier Mar 6 '12 at 3:46
    
Hey Ivan I have got ur thoughts on inheritance,but kindly look at this one also "why do I see Sealed and Private constructor examples on MSDN" –  dotNetSoldier Mar 6 '12 at 3:48

I think you're mixing two different things here. The singleton pattern calls for a single instance that is used by all callers. Inheritance just means I can share common logic between a class hierarchy. This, I feel, is an implementation of the singleton pattern: (ignore the lack of locking/thread safety, for the example's sake)

public class Singleton
{
    private static Singleton _instance;
    public static Singleton Instance
    {
         get 
         { 
            if (_instance == null)
            {
                 // This is the original code.
                 //_instance = new Singleton();

                 // This is newer code, after I extended Singleton with
                 // a better implementation.
                 _instance = new BetterSingleton();
            }
            return _instance;
         }
    }

    public virtual void ActualMethod() { // whatever }
}

public class BetterSingleton : Singleton
{
    public override void ActualMethod() { // newer implementation }
}

We still have a singleton, accessed through the Singleton class's static Instance member. But the exact identity of that instance can be extended through subclassing.

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thanks for droping a reply +1 for that,Now whats does "DoARuntimeCheck()" do ? Some comments would be helpful :) –  dotNetSoldier Mar 5 '12 at 15:36
    
I was suggesting a possibility where the specific singleton implementation is determined at runtime. I'll change the code to a simpler version. –  Avner Shahar-Kashtan Mar 5 '12 at 15:39
    
Here, I changed it to simulate a change in the project over time: We used to use Singleton, now we use BetterSingleton. But because we used inheritance, the code that calls Singleton.Instance.ActualMethod() doesn't know or care that we switched implementations. –  Avner Shahar-Kashtan Mar 5 '12 at 15:40
    
Are not both example(From Ivan and Avner Shahar-Kashtan) same ? –  dotNetSoldier Mar 6 '12 at 4:05
1  
Similar except Ivan's allows the user to replace the instance, while in mine it's determined during program startup and is fixed from there on. –  Avner Shahar-Kashtan Mar 6 '12 at 6:46

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