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Does Java have some analog of oracle's function MONTHS_BETWEEN?

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1  
This is the same as Java Date month difference. –  Matthew Flaschen Feb 1 '12 at 17:49
1  
Actually it's different to that question, mainly because months_between returns a fraction and the other q asks for whole numbers. –  Adrian Mouat Oct 17 '12 at 18:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can do that with :

public static int monthsBetween(Date minuend, Date subtrahend){  

    Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();   
    cal.setTime(minuend);  
    int minuendMonth =  cal.get(Calendar.MONTH);  
    int minuendYear = cal.get(Calendar.YEAR);  
    cal.setTime(subtrahend);  
    int subtrahendMonth =  cal.get(Calendar.MONTH);  
    int subtrahendYear = cal.get(Calendar.YEAR);  

    return ((minuendYear - subtrahendYear) * (cal.getMaximum(Calendar.MONTH)+1)) +    
    (minuendMonth - subtrahendMonth);  
}  

Edit :

According to this documentation MONTHS_BETWEEN return a fractional result, I think this method do the same :

public static void main(String[] args) throws ParseException {
    SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("dd/MM/yyyy");
    Date d = sdf.parse("02/02/1995");
    Date d2 = sdf.parse("01/01/1995");
    System.out.println(monthsBetween(d, d2));

}

public static double monthsBetween(Date baseDate, Date dateToSubstract){  

    Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();   
    cal.setTime(baseDate);
    int baseDayOfYear = cal.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_YEAR);  
    int baseMonth =  cal.get(Calendar.MONTH);  
    int baseYear = cal.get(Calendar.YEAR);  

    cal.setTime(dateToSubstract);  
    int subDayOfYear = cal.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_YEAR);
    int subMonth =  cal.get(Calendar.MONTH);  
    int subYear = cal.get(Calendar.YEAR);  

    //int fullMonth = ((baseYear - subYear) * (cal.getMaximum(Calendar.MONTH)+1)) +    
    //(baseMonth - subMonth);  
    //System.out.println(fullMonth);

    return ((baseYear - subYear) * (cal.getMaximum(Calendar.MONTH)+1)) +   
           (baseDayOfYear-subDayOfYear)/31.0;
} 
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Oracle's months_between returns a fraction, not an int. –  Adrian Mouat Oct 11 '12 at 9:20
    
@AdrianMouat You're right! I've post an edit. –  alain.janinm Oct 12 '12 at 17:28
    
Nice, but I think it's still wrong. Consider 31st Jan -> 28th Feb. I suspect Oracle will tell you there is 1.0 months between those dates, whereas you have 28/31. It's almost impossible to recreate the function as months are weird and we can only guess how Oracle have programmed it. –  Adrian Mouat Oct 17 '12 at 18:54
    
Actually, I'm wrong, months_between does return 28/31 for that date. but consider 1st Feb to 1st March, which does return 1. –  Adrian Mouat Oct 18 '12 at 10:06
    
Ah, I forgot this year was a leap year: 31st Jan -> 29 Feb has 1.0 months. –  Adrian Mouat Oct 18 '12 at 10:09

In Joda Time there is a monthsBetween in the org.joda.time.Months class.

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Yes, but it will return an integer value, not a fractional one. –  Adrian Mouat Oct 11 '12 at 9:19

The previous answers are not perfect because they do not handle dates such as Feb 31.

Here is my iterative interpretation of MONTHS_BETWEEN in Javascript...

    // Replica of the Oracle function MONTHS_BETWEEN where it calculates based on 31-day months
    var MONTHS_BETWEEN = function(d1, d2) {
        // Don't even try to calculate if it's the same day
        if (d1.getTicks() === d2.getTicks()) return 0;

        var totalDays = 0;
        var earlyDte = (d1 < d2 ? d1 : d2); // Put the earlier date in here
        var laterDate = (d1 > d2 ? d1 : d2); // Put the later date in here
        // We'll need to compare dates using string manipulation because dates such as 
        // February 31 will not parse correctly with the native date object
        var earlyDteStr = [(earlyDte.getMonth() + 1), earlyDte.getDate(), earlyDte.getFullYear()];

        // Go in day-by-day increments, treating every month as having 31 days
        while (earlyDteStr[2] < laterDate.getFullYear() ||
               earlyDteStr[2] == laterDate.getFullYear() && earlyDteStr[0] < (laterDate.getMonth() + 1) ||
               earlyDteStr[2] == laterDate.getFullYear() && earlyDteStr[0] == (laterDate.getMonth() + 1) && earlyDteStr[1] < laterDate.getDate()) {
            if (earlyDteStr[1] + 1 < 32) {
                earlyDteStr[1] += 1; // Increment the day
            } else {
                // If we got to this clause, then we need to carry over a month
                if (earlyDteStr[0] + 1 < 13) {
                    earlyDteStr[0] += 1; // Increment the month
                } else {
                    // If we got to this clause, then we need to carry over a year
                    earlyDteStr[2] += 1; // Increment the year
                    earlyDteStr[0] = 1; // Reset the month
                }
                earlyDteStr[1] = 1; // Reset the day
            }

            totalDays += 1; // Add to our running sum of days for this iteration
        }
        return (totalDays / 31.0);
    };
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Nice try, but I doubt this will work either - I expect you need a concept of "last day of month" for starters. Also, it's not Java... –  Adrian Mouat May 3 '13 at 10:36

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