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I have a set of user controls on a page that are dynamically loaded based on condition to run a variety reports (the condition driver). Each control has one or more properties exposed that will be used to get data from my database query. Because the controls vary for each report I wrote a procedure to access the appropriate control's property by name so I can send it to the database query in the code behind (C#). I got it all setup to access the public property like this:

stringVal = userControl.Attributes[stringName].ToString();

and it is telling me that I need to new up an object. I don't understand how I need to access that property dynamically by string name. In my immediate window I can see the property I want; but, it is not an "Attribute" as control.Attributes.Count = 0. So, how do I need to set this up properly so I can access it by string name? Do I need to decorate the property with something?

Thank you in advance.

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new up mean that you would create an new instance of that user control. for example UserControl usrCtrl = new UserControl –  DJ KRAZE Feb 1 '12 at 18:31
    
Using reflection as it seems you are isn't a great way to go. If you know you're going to want to ask each of these varied control types for their Name, for instance, just create an abstract that has and implements that property then derive the controls from it. –  Yuck Feb 1 '12 at 18:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Below, I've written a wrapper class you can use to set/get public fields or properties of the wrapped class by string name.

First, let's look at how you could use it on a class that had the public fields or properties StartDate and SocialSecurityNumber.

// First create the instance we'll want to play with
MyUserControl myControlInstance = new MyUsercontrol();
// MyUserContol has two properties we'll be using
// DateTime StartDate
// int SocialSecurityNumber

// Now we're creating a map to facilitate access to the properties
// of "myControlInstance" using strings
PropertyMap<MyUserControl> map = 
             new PropertyMap<MyUserControl>(myControlInstance);

// Since the map is directed toward "myControlInstance"
// this line is equivalent to:
// myControlInstance.StartDate = Datetime.Now;
map.Set<DateTime>("StartDate", DateTime.Now);

// This line is equivalent to:
// ssn = myUsercontrol.SocialSecurityNumber;
int ssn = map.Get<int>("SocialSecurityNumber");

And now on to how it's implemented:

public class PropertyMap<T>
{
    readonly T Instance;

    public PropertyMap(T instance)
    {
        Instance = instance;
    }

    public U Get<U>(string PropertyName)
    {
        // Search through the type's properties for one with this name
        // Properties are things with get/set accessors
        PropertyInfo property = typeof(T).GetProperty(PropertyName);
        if (property == null)
        {
            // if we couldn't find a property, look for a field.
            // Fields are just member variables, but you can only
            // manipulate public ones like this.
            FieldInfo field = typeof(T).GetField(PropertyName);
            if (field == null)
                throw new Exception("Couldn't find a property/field named " + PropertyName);
            return (U)field.GetValue(Instance);
        }
        return (U)property.GetValue(Instance, null);
    }

    public void Set<U>(string PropertyName, U value)
    {
        // Search through the type's properties for one with this name
        PropertyInfo property = typeof(T).GetProperty(PropertyName);
        if (property == null)
        {
            // if we couldn't find a property, look for a field.
            FieldInfo field = typeof(T).GetField(PropertyName);
            if (field == null)
                throw new Exception("Couldn't find a property/field named " + PropertyName);
            field.SetValue(Instance, value);
            return;
        }
        property.SetValue(Instance, value, null);
    }
}
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Sorry, which using statement do I need to reference "Instance". –  Edward Feb 1 '12 at 20:44
    
Are you asking how you can access the inner instance when you only have a map? In the implementation I provided, the Instance member is private, but you could put a "public" in front of it, and then access it as map.Instance, for example. –  CodeGnome Feb 1 '12 at 20:47
    
No actually, I pasted the code into my project and after adding using System.Reflection for the PropertyInfo and FieldInfo references everything is recognized except Instance. Looking at your code it would appear that Instance needs a using statement. I found Instance in System.Reflection.BindingFlags but I am not sure that is what Instance is referring to. –  Edward Feb 1 '12 at 20:58
    
How bizarre - "Instance" is a member of the PropertyMap<T> class, but isn't a class itself. I was able to compile and run the code. Perhaps if you replace the upper cased Instance text with mWrapped and see if it generates the same error? Also, which line generated the error? –  CodeGnome Feb 1 '12 at 21:12
    
The mWrapped didn't work either and my machine was really slowing down after debugging several changes; so, I rebooted it and tried it again and magically it worked. Thank you for the assistance. –  Edward Feb 1 '12 at 21:29

You need to explore reflection. It relates to manipulating metadata of .NET types (classes, structs, enums, etc). However, if you're running your app in shared hosting with partial trust, you may not be able to have any kind of reflection code run at all (security restriction on the server). If this is the case, test on a small/quick example first (on your hosting), and then make decisions appropriately: whether to redesign your app or change hosts.

A reflection-related snippet that might be useful to you (paste this somewhere within the user control class, as this.GetType() matters:

var properties = this.GetType().GetProperties(System.Reflection.BindingFlags.Public | System.Reflection.BindingFlags.Instance);

foreach (var p in properties)
{
    string propertyName = p.Name;
}

There are other ways to get the type; e.g. typeof(yourclassname); you can also reflect/get all types from given assembly (dll), and much more.

share|improve this answer
    
This answer is also very useful and I may end up using it instead of the previous answer. Thank you Hari. –  Edward Feb 1 '12 at 21:59

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