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I have a 64x64 canvas square element which I want to repeat in x- and y-directions to fill the page. I've found many explanations on how to do this with an image, but none explaining how to do it with a canvas element. Here is my code so far:

$(document).ready(function(){
    var canvas = document.getElementById('dkBg');
    var ctx = canvas.getContext('2d');  
    ctx.canvas.width  = window.innerWidth;
    ctx.canvas.height = window.innerHeight;
    ctx.fillStyle = 'rgb(0,0,0)';
    //I want the following rectangle to be repeated:
    ctx.fillRect(0,0,64,64);
    for(var w=0; w<=64; w++){
            for(var h=0; h<=64; h++){
                    rand = Math.floor(Math.random()*50);
                    while(rand<20){
                            rand = Math.floor(Math.random()*50);
                    }
                    opacity = Math.random();
                    while(opacity<0.5){
                            opacity = Math.random();
                    }
                    ctx.fillStyle= 'rgba('+rand+','+rand+','+rand+','+opacity+')';
                    ctx.fillRect(w,h,1,1);
            }
    }
});

The thing is, I don't want all of the random numbers/etc to be regenerated. I just want to tile the exact same square to fit the page. Is this possible?

Here is a fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/ecMDq/

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Doing what you want is actually super easy. You do not need to use images at all. The createPattern function accepts an image or another canvas! (Or a video tag, even)

All you have to do is make a canvas that is only 64x64 large and make the pattern on it. Let's call this canvas pattern. You only have to make your design once.

Then with the context of the main canvas we can do:

// "pattern" is our 64x64 canvas, see code in fiddle
var pattern = ctx.createPattern(pattern, "repeat");
ctx.fillStyle = pattern;

Working example using your code to make the pattern, then repeating it onto a 500x500 canvas:

http://jsfiddle.net/tGa8M/

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Thanks for this. I chose this answer because it was simpler and seemed like a better way of doing this. –  DC_ Feb 1 '12 at 22:14

You can get the base64 version of your image using the toDataURL() method of the canvas element.

From there it's as simple as setting the background-image of your page to the string "url(" + base64 + ")"

Here is a working example: http://jsfiddle.net/ecMDq/1/

$(document).ready(function(){
    var canvas = document.getElementById('dkBg');
    var ctx = canvas.getContext('2d');  
    ctx.canvas.width  = 64; //window.innerWidth;
    ctx.canvas.height = 64; //window.innerHeight;
    ctx.fillStyle = 'rgb(0,0,0)';
    //I want the following rectangle to be repeated:
    ctx.fillRect(0,0,64,64);
    for(var w=0; w<=64; w++){
            for(var h=0; h<=64; h++){
                    rand = Math.floor(Math.random()*50);
                    while(rand<20){
                            rand = Math.floor(Math.random()*50);
                    }
                    opacity = Math.random();
                    while(opacity<0.5){
                            opacity = Math.random();
                    }
                    ctx.fillStyle= 'rgba('+rand+','+rand+','+rand+','+opacity+')';
                    ctx.fillRect(w,h,1,1);
            }
    }

    document.documentElement.style.backgroundImage = 
        'url(' +canvas.toDataURL() + ')';

});

Note that you need to make the canvas 64x64 because that's the size of your source image. You can also now make the canvas display:none, or even remove it from the dom completely because it's only acting as a source for the background-image.

Also, what on earth is up with those while loops?

while(rand<20){
        rand = Math.floor(Math.random()*50);
}

It looks like you're trying to enforce a minimum value. Just use this:

rand = Math.floor(Math.random() * (50-20) + 20);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this answer. While I didn't choose it, I never would have thought of doing it like this and I find it very interesting. I might use this technique in the future but at this point I want to keep everything within a canvas tag rather than use a background-image. –  DC_ Feb 1 '12 at 22:16

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