Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Say I create a class and a protocol like this:

@protocol MyProtocol
@required
- (void) doSomething;
@end

@interface MyClass id<MyProtocol>
@property int aNumber;
@end

@implementation MyClass
@synthesize aNumber = aNumber_;
- (void) doSomething { aNumber_++; }
@end

I can obviously pass instances of MyClass around by treating them as id<MyProtocol>s. I can't access aNumber though, if I'm dealing with something declared as id<MyProtocol>. That's expected.

I needed to do this recently. I wanted to keep using the protocol to refer to instances of my class (runtime determined) but I also wanted to access the classes properties too. I found that I could do this:

@protocol MyProtocol
@required
- (void) doSomething;
- (int) aNumber;
@end

And now anywhere I have an instance of an id<MyProtocol> I can also call [instance aNumber], without having to code up accessors directly - the synthesise call effectively implements that part of protocol for me. I could also add the setter as well, if I like.

Have I stumbled upon an intentional feature, or is this sort of thing a Bad Idea which will end up causing me problems down the line?

Thanks

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Completely intentional.

When you write:

@property int aNumber;

this is really just shorthand for:

- (int) aNumber;
- (void) setaNumber:(int)value;

and the dot notation, object.property, is just shorthand for calling one of these two methods (depending on whether you are reading from, or assigning to, the property).

The @synthesize statement just writes the two methods for you.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, as long as its not going to surprise other programmers later on then it's a useful trick. –  Tim Kemp Feb 1 '12 at 20:13
    
You can if you wish put @property (readonly) int aNumber; in your protocol - which is of course another way of writing - (int) aNumber; –  CRD Feb 2 '12 at 7:40
    
Thanks. I'm familiar with properties; I was more asking if the usage with protocols was idiomatic. Seems like it is. –  Tim Kemp Feb 2 '12 at 14:29

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.