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In below program i am getting output as false .But as per my understanding when we add two temporary reference variable then result go inside constant pool which does not allow duplicates so we must have gotten output as true here but we are getting false as an output.Can somebody explain me reason behind this?

package com.lara;

public class Man9 
{
    public static void main(String[] args) 
    {
        String s1 = "ja";
        String s2 = "va";
        String s3 = "ja".concat("va");
        String s4 = "java";
        System.out.println(s3==s4);
    }
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to use s3.equals(s4), not s3==s4.

Then you will get your true result.

See transcript below

C:\temp>java foo
false
true

C:\temp>type foo.java
public class foo
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        String s1 = "ja";
        String s2 = "va";
        String s3 = "ja".concat("va");
        String s4 = "java";
        System.out.println(s3==s4);
        System.out.println(s3.equals(s4));
    }
}
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if i use s3.equals(s4) then i will get True as output,but i am confused here because equals() method internally uses == operator for comparison and i also know that in String class equals() method is overrided.Could you explain me the whole thing properly ?i will highly appreciate your help –  love with java Feb 1 '12 at 20:07
    
@saurabhRai: String.equals doesn't just use == - it probably checks for reference identity first as an optimization, but then it will check whether the two strings are of equal length, with the same sequence of characters. –  Jon Skeet Feb 1 '12 at 20:13
    
The == operator will compare references (roughly, what is called a pointer in C). It will only return true if the two Objects (Strings in this case) are kept in the same "memory address". That's the case if the two Strings are created at compile time and have the same value, like someone showed in another answer. –  Renato Feb 1 '12 at 20:18
    
But generally, the Strings created by methods like in your question are created at run-time, so they will almost certainly have different memory addresses. Hence, for String comparison, you must use equals() method, which String class overrides to compare the Strings character by character, which is what you really want. –  Renato Feb 1 '12 at 20:18
    
ANY Object's equals() method should begin by comparing references, and that's what the String.equals() method does, because if the two Objects are kept in the same memory address, they are obviously equal! Only when they're not, you actually have to do some work and compare by value. –  Renato Feb 1 '12 at 20:20

Your understanding about string concatenation is incorrect.

Only string constants get interned by default. Now a string constant isn't just a string literal - it can include the concatenation of other constants using the + operator, e.g.

String x = "hello";
String y = "hel" + "lo";
// x == y, as the concatenation has been performed at compile-time

But in your case, you're making a method call - and that's not part of what the Java Language Specification considers when determining constant string expressions.

See section 15.28 of the JLS for what is considered a "constant".

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in your example result will be true –  love with java Feb 1 '12 at 19:56
    
Yes, that's what he explains... –  Guillaume Feb 1 '12 at 19:57
    
@saurabhRai: Yes, because it's using +. You're not using +, you're calling String.concat explicitly. Therefore the concatenation is not performed at compile-time, and the result doesn't end up interned. –  Jon Skeet Feb 1 '12 at 20:04
    
@JonSkeet thanks now i get your point that internally concat() method using this as reference for "ja" and this is permanent reference variable.If i am wrong please correct me –  love with java Feb 1 '12 at 20:10
    
@saurabhRai: I have no idea what you mean by "permanent reference variable". That's not standard terminology, and neither is "temporary reference variable". –  Jon Skeet Feb 1 '12 at 20:12

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