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I want to be able to limit the amount of duplicate records in a mySQL database table to 2.

(Excluding the id field which is auto increment)

My table is set up like

id    city      item
---------------------
1     Miami     4
2     Detroit   5
3     Miami     4
4     Miami     18
5     Miami     4

So in that table, only row 5 would be deleted.

How can I do this?

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1  
What have you tried? –  BNL Feb 1 '12 at 20:17
2  
Why allow any duplicate records at all? –  Bernard Feb 1 '12 at 20:17
    
I'm afraid you will have to use some sort of script\pl-sql with a loop for that. –  gdoron Feb 1 '12 at 20:18
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5 Answers

MySQL has some foibles when reading and writing to the same table. So I don't actually know if this will work, the syntax is fine in many implementations of SQL, but I don't know if it's MySQL friendly...

DELETE
  yourTable
WHERE
  1 < (SELECT COUNT(*)
       FROM yourTable as Lookup
       WHERE city = yourTable.city AND item = yourTable.item AND id < yourTable.id)

EDIT

Amazingly convoluted, but worth a try?

DELETE
  yourTable
FROM
  yourTable
INNER JOIN
(
  SELECT
    id
  FROM
  (
    SELECT
      id
    FROM
      yourTable
    WHERE
      1 < (SELECT COUNT(*)
           FROM yourTable as Lookup
           WHERE city = yourTable.city AND item = yourTable.item AND id < yourTable.id)
  )
    AS inner_deletes
)
  AS deletes
    ON deletes.id = yourTable.id
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That's going to delete all of the qualifying records though. So if a particular item has 4 occurances, all of them will be deleted. –  Yuck Feb 1 '12 at 20:24
    
@yuck - No, the id < yourTable.id means that the first occurrence returns a count of 0, the second a count of 1, and the rest a count greater than 1. So 2 occurrences with the lowest IDs remain. –  MatBailie Feb 1 '12 at 20:28
    
+1 And you might edit that explanation into your answer as I think it's very helpful. –  Yuck Feb 1 '12 at 20:30
    
Thanks for the help. It didnt work though, I used DELETE FROM store_firearms WHERE 2 < (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM store_firearms as Lookup WHERE city = store_firearms.city AND weapon = store_firearms.weapon AND id < store_firearms.id) and it returns the error: You can't specify target table 'store_firearms' for update in FROM clause –  user1022585 Feb 1 '12 at 20:40
    
@user1022585 - That's the foible I meant. I've added a simple, but convoluted, change, hope it works. –  MatBailie Feb 1 '12 at 20:52
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I think your problem here is that both your code and/or table structure allows inserting duplicates and you are asking this question when you should really fix your db and/or code.

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i think a better solution is avoid allow more than 5 registers, you have to implement a validation where if select count(*) > 3 you will not accept the new insert.

because if you want to do this into the data tier, you have to use a stored procedure , because first you need to identify all the register with more than 3 registers and delete only the last . Saludos

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You're assuming the OP has control over the application. Maybe that is the case, but the question is strictly about scrubbing data. –  Yuck Feb 1 '12 at 20:42
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Due to MySQL being notoriously difficult when it comes to updating queried tables (see for example the answers from Dems), the best I can figure out is sadly more than one statement but on the plus side fairly readable;

CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE Dump AS SELECT id FROM table1 WHERE id NOT IN 
  (SELECT MIN(id) FROM table1 GROUP BY city,item UNION
   SELECT MAX(id) FROM table1 GROUP BY city,item);

DELETE FROM table1 where id in (select * from Dump);

DROP TABLE DUMP;

Not sure if it was important which duplicate was removed, this keeps the first and last.

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is there any easy way to make it save say, 3 rows, or 5? –  user1022585 Feb 1 '12 at 21:58
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In your reply to Joachim's answer, you ask about saving 3 or 5 rows, this is one way to accomplish it. Depending on how you are using this database, you could either call this in a loop, or you could turn it into a stored procedure. Either way, you would continue to run this entire block of code until Rows Affected = 0:

drop table if exists TempTable;
create table TempTable
select city, item,
       count(*) as record_count, 
       min(id) as ItemToDrop -- this could be changed to max() if you 
                             -- want to delete new stuff instead 
from YourTable
group by city, item
having count(*) > 2; -- This value = number of rows you save

delete from YourTable
where id in (select ItemToDrop from TempTable);
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