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I'm going through a book on Java and I've been understanding most of it so far. However, I've run across some code that I can't seem to figure out. This is from a simple Blackjack game:

public class CardDeckTest {

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        CardDeck deck = new CardDeck();
        System.out.println("Deck Listing:");
        deck.list();
        Card card = deck.deal();
        System.out.println("Dealt " + card);
        card = deck.deal();
        System.out.println("Dealt " + card);
        System.out.println("Top index: " + deck.getTopIndex());
        deck.reset();
        System.out.println("Reset deck... Top index: " + deck.getTopIndex());
        card = deck.deal();
        System.out.println("Dealt " + card);
        System.out.println("The last card is " + deck.getCard(deck.getNumCards() - 1));
    }
}

The confusing line to me is Card card = deck.deal(); So far I've seen lines similar to the second one, with a "new" in it. What is this line doing? Why isn't there a "new" there.

I believe it's referring to this in CardDeck

public Card deal() {
        Card dealt = cards[top];
        top ++;
        if (top >= cards.length) reset();
        return dealt;
    }

Thank you!

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7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It is invoking the deal method on a specific instance of CardDeck, and returning an instance of Card, which is being stored in the local variable card. Does that help?

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Yeah, that helps a lot. Thanks! –  Vecta Feb 1 '12 at 21:02

The method deal() returns a Card instance as you can see in the line

return dealt;

This Card instance is the assigned to card.

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The CardDeck class maintains an array of cards, presumable in random order.

When your code strikes the line:

Card card = deck.deal();

it calls the member function to retrieve the next card in the array, and advances the deck pointer to the next card.

The function, with appropriate comments:

public Card deal() {
        Card dealt = cards[top];    // get card from top (initially 0).
        top ++;                     // advance top so next time we get next card.
        if (top >= cards.length)    // deck empty, then reshuffle.
            reset();
        return dealt;               // give card to caller.
    }
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There must be a new somewhere, I'm guessing that when you invoke

new CardDeck()

it is creating the cards[] and populating the contents. Because the Card within the array has already been created you don't need to create a new one, instead you just declare a reference to it.

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The Deck has already allocated the card object at the top of the code. This method is simply returning a reference to the top card on the deck and then incrementing top of the deck. This prevents the card from being redrawn on subsequent calls. When the top is outside of the deck limits then it resets the top so you can draw cards again.

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The line

Card card = deck.deal()

Is assigning a Card object to the variable 'card'. When you see instances of 'new' like:

CardDeck deck = new CardDeck();

It's just assigning a CardDeck object to the variable 'deck'.

The main difference between the two is that you are creating a NEW CardDeck object that didn't exist, and assigning it to the variable 'deck'. For deck.deal() you are getting a Card object that exists somewhere and assigning it to 'card'

Hope that helps

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looking even in more detail, it appears that the function (this is an educated guess) deck.list() or the constructor probably creates the cards that are part of the deck, so this function will just fetch the Card objects that are already part of deck –  jeffchong07 Feb 1 '12 at 20:50

The Card already exists in cards[top]; it was already created. The following line causes a variable named card of type Card to refer to it:

Card card = deck.deal();

In Java, many variables can refer to the same object. Just because you declare a reference doesn't mean you need a new object:

Deck gameDeck = new Deck(); // same deck

Deck bobDeck   = gameDeck;
Deck aliceDeck = gameDeck;  // two players
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