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I am attempting to write a data roller script that will locate all datetime columns in a demo database and roll them forward by x amount of days. I'm trying to keep this as dynamic as possible due to the fact that our database schema is not set (still in development). With the exception of a few columns (which I will exclude later), this statement identifies an update statement that will roll the datetime column forward:

SELECT 

    'UPDATE ' + [isc].[TABLE_NAME] + ' SET ' +
    [isc].[COLUMN_NAME] + 
    '= ' + [isc].[COLUMN_NAME] + '+ ' + 
    CAST(@DaysToRollForward AS NVARCHAR(5))  AS DySQL

FROM [INFORMATION_SCHEMA].COLUMNS AS isc
INNER JOIN [INFORMATION_SCHEMA].tables AS ist
    ON [ist].[TABLE_NAME] = [isc].[TABLE_NAME]
        WHERE [isc].[DATA_TYPE] = 'datetime'
            AND [ist].[TABLE_TYPE] = 'base table' 

I am not against using a cursor since this is only a demo server, and will never really see much of a load. We are just doing this to keep our records current so we always have data visible in the application. I've tried the below cursor, and it is not executing the UPDATE statements . Any ideas? Do I have the right idea? I've seen a few help posts on here, but most are executing a stored procedure within the BEGIN - END block. Also, if there is a set based approach to this, I would be interested in that, although if there is an easy fix to my cursor that would be fine too. As I mentioned this is only a demo / qa server.

USE [sCRMDB1_demo]

GO

DECLARE @OrganizationId BIGINT
DECLARE @dySQL NVARCHAR(256)
DECLARE @DaysToRollForward INT


SET @DaysToRollForward = 7

DECLARE db_cursor_rollbackdates CURSOR FOR

SELECT 
    'UPDATE ' + [isc].[TABLE_NAME] + ' SET ' +
    [isc].[COLUMN_NAME] + 
    '= ' + [isc].[COLUMN_NAME] + '+ ' + 
    CAST(@DaysToRollForward AS NVARCHAR(5))  AS DySQL

FROM [INFORMATION_SCHEMA].COLUMNS AS isc
INNER JOIN [INFORMATION_SCHEMA].tables AS ist
    ON [ist].[TABLE_NAME] = [isc].[TABLE_NAME]
        WHERE [isc].[DATA_TYPE] = 'datetime'
            AND [ist].[TABLE_TYPE] = 'base table' 


OPEN db_cursor_rollbackdates
FETCH NEXT FROM db_cursor_rollbackdates INTO @dySQL

WHILE @@FETCH_STATUS = 0

BEGIN
    --PRINT CAST(@dySQL AS NVARCHAR(200))
    EXEC (@dySQL)
    FETCH NEXT FROM db_cursor_rollbackdates
END

CLOSE db_cursor_rollbackdates
DEALLOCATE db_cursor_rollbackdates
share|improve this question
    
Would it be possible to, instead of updating umpteen unknown columns, you just told the server it was some other date? To make it think all those stored dates were 'current'? I'd imagine updating the database might wreak havok with some of your tests regardless - much better to have a 'frozen' system. Of course, in your test load scripts, use CURRENT_DATE, but those would have to be maintained otherwise anyways... –  Clockwork-Muse Feb 1 '12 at 23:26

1 Answer 1

You'll kick yourself...

Within the loop you have

FETCH NEXT FROM db_cursor_rollbackdates

this is essentially just a select statement and leaves @dySQL unaltered, so your line EXEC(@dySQL) is doing the same update over and over again, this is why you are not seeing the days updated across the database. You need to change this to:

FETCH NEXT FROM db_cursor_rollbackdates INTO @dySQL

This can't be done in a set based solution, since you are updating multiple columns in multiple tables. In terms of alternative solutions, search for "Cursors vs Temp tables" and make your own mind up on performance impacts. I personally prefer the temp table approach, however would probably be lynched by some if I suggested this was the "correct" way to go! Also, if you have a lot of tables with multiple datetime columns and large amounts of data then you might increase performance slightly by using temp tables and using nested loops i.e. loop through all tables with at least one datetime column in, then within each loop loop through all the datetime columns building the sql dynamically for each table so that only one update is done per table, no matter how many datetime columns they have. Since this is a development server, and the same procedure won't be required on the production server I would not worry about performance of this if I were you, as long as it works concentrate on other areas of development!

Finally be aware of other date formats (Smalldatetime, Date, Datetime2), your cursor currently won't pick them up.

share|improve this answer
    
dohhh! Works like a charm now :). Thanks for the heads up on the other date/time datatypes. I will need to validate for those as well. –  user1183712 Feb 1 '12 at 22:51

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