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I don't know if it's possible, but I'm trying to assign different dates to each user as the are entered into the database using a loop (I know that bit's possible). To do this I'm building the timestamp using mktime() but my column is datetime (for the purpose of MySQL ORDERBY timestamp DESC) and, naturally, the two don't go together.

My code:

<?php
    foreach($arr as $user_uid => $num) {
      $i = 1;
        while($num > 0) {
          $i++;
          $t = new DateTime("Y-m-d H:i:s", date(mktime(0, 0, 0, $i, 1, 2012)));
          $num--;
        }
     }
?>

At the moment this returns: 0000-00-00 00:00:00.

Any help would be appreciated, thanks!

EDIT: An amount has changed, my code now reads like this:

foreach($arr as $user_uid => $num) {
    $i = 1;
        while($num > 0) {
            $i++;
            $t = date('Y-m-d H:i:s', mktime(0, 0, 0, $i, 1, 2012));
            $num--;
        }

$game = "INSERT INTO wd_game_$gid (game_uid,user_uid,lastmove,startcountry,money) VALUES ('$gid','$user_uid',FROM_UNIXTIME('$t'),'$rand_c','$money')";

This now inserts: 1970-01-01 00:00:00

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Solution 1 - use FROM_UNIXTIME() on databse layer

You can do this on the database side, using FROM_UNIXTIME() function (the argument is Unix epoch timestamp, so this is the same as the result of your mktime()).

Solution 2 - fix your current code

Also your code is incorrect, because you pass incorrect date into DateTime constructor (see the documentation). You pass "Y-m-d H:i:s" instead of date('Y-m-d H:i:s', mktime(0, 0, 0, $i, 1, 2012)). You can even resign from using DateTime and just stick to using date('Y-m-d H:i:s', mktime(0, 0, 0, $i, 1, 2012)), as this is sufficient for your database insert.

share|improve this answer
    
This inserts 1970-01-01 00:00:00 – AviateX14 Feb 1 '12 at 21:41
    
@AviateX14: Which insert this? The reason is that you are passing 0 into FROM_UNIXTIME() or into date()'s second parameter. – Tadeck Feb 1 '12 at 21:42
    
I'm not quite sure I'm following... If the $t variable value was, date('Y-m-d H:i:s', mktime(1, 2, 3, $i, 1, 2012)) - it should input the date/time right? Not, 1970-01-01 00:00:00, which it does. – AviateX14 Feb 1 '12 at 21:48
    
If you look at the edit on my original post you can see what's happening... – AviateX14 Feb 1 '12 at 21:49
    
@AviateX14: This is why I named part of my answer "Solution 1...", and the second part "Solution 2...". You mixed them both :) Just pick one and 1) assign result of mktime() to the $t variable, then do FROM_UNIXTIME($t) in the query, or 2) assign the result of date('Y-m-d H:i:s', mktime(0, 0, 0, $i, 1, 2012)) to the $t variable and then just do $t in the query (see, in this case there is no FROM_UNIXTIME(). Is it clear enough? – Tadeck Feb 1 '12 at 21:56

You're approach isn't quite right I don't think. Try:

foreach($arr as $user_uid => $num) {
  $i = 1;
    while($num > 0) {
      $i++;
      $t = date("Y-m-d H:i:s", mktime(0, 0, 0, $i, 1, 2012));
      $num--;
    }
 }

The DateTime() constructor has two optional parameters. A string representing the time and a string representing the time zone - see the DateTime __construct reference

share|improve this answer
    
That also inserted: 0000-00-00 00:00:00, As the other commenter said, my problem may be elsewhere, thanks I'll check out the link. – AviateX14 Feb 1 '12 at 21:29

Should be

$t = new DateTime(date("Y-m-d H:i:s", mktime(0, 0, 0, $i, 1, 2012)));

(The format string is the first parameter of date)


EDIT: As I've said in the comments, don't confuse php DateTime class with MySQL DATETIME data type.

You can do this:

$t = mktime(0, 0, 0, $i, 1, 2012);  // $t contains now a unix timestamp

// ... 

$game = "INSERT INTO wd_game_$gid (game_uid,user_uid,lastmove,startcountry,money) VALUES ".
        "('$gid','$user_uid',FROM_UNIXTIME($t),'$rand_c','$money')";

Or this:

$t = date("Y-m-d H:i:s", mktime(0, 0, 0, $i, 1, 2012));
// $t contains a textual representation of MySQL DATETIME value

// ... 

$game = "INSERT INTO wd_game_$gid (game_uid,user_uid,lastmove,startcountry,money) VALUES ".
        "('$gid','$user_uid','$t','$rand_c','$money')";
share|improve this answer
    
Still only inserts "0000-00-00 00:00:00" – AviateX14 Feb 1 '12 at 21:23
    
@AviateX14, where? If i run print_r(new DateTime(date("Y-m-d H:i:s", mktime(0,0,0,1,1,2012)))); I get the correct output. So your problem must be somewhere else. – Czechnology Feb 1 '12 at 21:25
    
I'll put the full code in the question as an edit, one moment. – AviateX14 Feb 1 '12 at 21:26
    
@AviateX14, should $t hold a timestamp or an instance of DateTime class? Don't confuse php DateTime class with MySQL DATETIME data type. – Czechnology Feb 1 '12 at 21:27
    
I did get them confused, thanks for clearing that up, using the FROM_UNIXTIME(), it inserts 1970-01-01 00:00:00, progress at least.. – AviateX14 Feb 1 '12 at 21:42

I don't see why you have to pass to FROM_UNIXTIME function the string representation of the date since you are already using DATETIME datatype. FROM_UNIXTIME parameter is unsigned int, thus the evaluation results 1970 as the year which is the equivalent of the start of the epoch

foreach($arr as $user_uid => $num) {
$i = 1;
    while($num > 0) {
        $i++;
        $t = date('Y-m-d H:i:s', mktime(0, 0, 0, $i, 1, 2012));
        $num--;
    }

$game = "INSERT INTO wd_game_$gid (game_uid,user_uid,lastmove,startcountry,money) VALUES      ('$gid','$user_uid','$t','$rand_c','$money')";
share|improve this answer

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