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Here is an example: I have the generic type called "Account". I wish to use this account to represent multiple business entities: 1. Customer 2. Client 3. Company

I wish to use the Account type for the above 3 entities (as they are all types of accounts in my system - where the type is an attribute of the Account). How would I represent this relationship?

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3 Answers

The only relationship you've described is that 'type' is an attribute of the Account. If Customer, Client, or Company are not strong enough entities on their own to deserve their own box on the Domain diagram, then you are done. In that case, you can include a note box associated with Account and say "Examples of values for the Type field: Customer, Client, Company, etc.".

If that is not strong enough, you may think about creating an AccountType class which have as sub-classes Customer, Client, Company. In that case you would draw an association from Account to AccountType, which replaces the need for the 'Type" attribute.

When I get a chance, I'll draw examples and post links to them.

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You can model the template class (Account) and then bind it to create three different classes using the association link and the bind stereotype on the link, as you can see here, under the "Class Template" title.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I believe the diagram I would use to communicate these relationships between diffrent objects is the "Collaboration" diagram, as what the relationships show is how the different objects are instantiated (Account is instantiated as Customer, Client and Company) and how they (the instances) would interact with each other

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