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In the Core Java Volume1 book there is a caution that say:

CAUTION: The right-hand side argument of the shift operators is reduced modulo 32 (unless the left-hand side is a long, in which case the right-hand side is reduced modulo 64). For example, the value of 1 << 35 is the same as 1 << 3 or 8.

What exactly does this mean? also why 1 become 8, instead of being 0 after 35 left shifting?

many thanks

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In many programming languages, shifting by more than the size of a numeric data type (32 bits for an int, 64 bits for a long) is undefined. On the other hand, Java defines it such that (n << d) is equivalent to (n << (d % 32)) where n is an int, and (n << d) is equivalent to (n << (d % 64)) where n is a long.

So, 1 << 35 is equivalent to 1 << (35 % 32), which equals 1 << 3 = 8.

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Reduced modulo 32 means (at its base level) you keep subtracting 32 until you have a number between 0 and 31 inclusive.

In other words:

actualValue = givenValue % 32;

The reason it does this is because it makes little sense to shift a 32-bit value 32 bits to the left (or right) since it will always be zero (because you're shifting bits out on one side and shifting zeros in on the other side - doing that 32 times to a 32-bit value is going to result in zero no matter what you started with).

So for Java integers (32-bit), 31 is the sensible limit. For longs (64-bit), 63 is the sensible limit.

In the example you give, 1 << 35 has the shift value reduced from 35 to 3 (since 35 % 32 == 3) and 1 << 3 is 8:

 Binary
0000 0001    (1 << 0) == 1
0000 0010    (1 << 1) == 2
0000 0100    (1 << 2) == 4
0000 1000    (1 << 3) == 8
     ||||
     |||+--- 1
     ||+---- 2
     |+----- 4
     +------ 8
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For more information, the language reference: java.sun.com/docs/books/jls/third_edition/html/… –  dsummersl Feb 1 '12 at 22:04

More succinctly

a << b

is the same as

a << (b & 31)

for int types.

The difference is that -1 % 32 is -1 whereas -1 & 31 is 31 and 1 << -1 == 0x80000000

This behaviour is defined in JLS 15.19

If the promoted type of the left-hand operand is int, only the five lowest-order bits of the right-hand operand are used as the shift distance. It is as if the right-hand operand were subjected to a bitwise logical AND operator & (§15.22.1) with the mask value 0x1f (0b11111). The shift distance actually used is therefore always in the range 0 to 31, inclusive.

If the promoted type of the left-hand operand is long, then only the six lowest-order bits of the right-hand operand are used as the shift distance. It is as if the right-hand operand were subjected to a bitwise logical AND operator & (§15.22.1) with the mask value 0x3f (0b111111). The shift distance actually used is therefore always in the range 0 to 63, inclusive.

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@mug896 It is defined in the JLS. Updated my answer. –  Peter Lawrey Apr 2 '14 at 16:49

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