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I'm learning common lisp I've been given a problem out of the uVA database (http://acm.uva.es/p/v101/10120.html) and a breadth search function (which takes in a start point, goal point and a legal move generator), i've got the theory down as to how i'm meant to get the answer but Lisp just isn't agreeing with me. Can i have some advice on how to proceed from this point onwards? Below is a link to the given problem and my two of my attempted solutions with lisp source code. Any help would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!

1.

(defun gift (N G)
(setq CR 9)
(setq i 3)
(cond ((= N G) "N and G equal")
    ((< N G) "Gift it on a rock outside limits")
    ((> N 49) "number of rocks is bigger than 49 - it will work")
    ((< N 9) "number of rocks is less than 9, it wont work")
    ((= N 0) "number of rocks is 0, it wont work")
    ((= G 0) "gift isn't on a rock, it wont work"))
(loop
  (setq I (+ I 1))
  (setq I (-(* I 2) 1))
  (setq CR 9) 
 (breadth-search CR G #'lmg-moves)
(when (= CR G) (return "Let me Try!"))
(when (> CR N) (return "Don't laugh at me!"))
  ))

(defun lmg-moves (I)
(list (+ 9 I)
    (- 9 I)
    ))

2.

(defvar *currentRock* 9)
(defvar *iterator* 3)

(defun gift (N G)
 (setq *iterator* (+ *iterator* 1))
 ;; (breadth-search *currentRock* G #'LMG)
)

(defun LMG (a)
(+ a (-(* *iterator* 2) 1))
   )

As can be seen above, the general idea is to simply apply a breadth-search function with the given legal move generator and hopefully, by analizing it's output we can determine whether we can reach the goal state or not. I will be glad to answer any questions if the code above is too confusing, thanks again!.

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you need to declare variables –  Rainer Joswig Feb 1 '12 at 22:19

2 Answers 2

Among other potential issues:

You're using LOOP wrong. See PCL for info on loop. I've rehacked it a bit, but I don't know what you are attempting.

SETF is recommended over SETQ, as SETF is more general.

INCF increments a place by 1.

Your indentation is bad; if you fixed that you would notice that you're falling off the end of COND into the LOOP. I'd recommend an auto-indenting editor for using Lisp here. (Emacs is the standby).

(defun gift (N G)
    (setq CR 9)
    (setq i 3)
    (cond ((= N G) "N and G equal")
          ((< N G) "Gift it on a rock outside limits")
          ((> N 49) "number of rocks is bigger than 49 - it will work")
          ((< N 9) "number of rocks is less than 9, it wont work")
          ((= N 0) "number of rocks is 0, it wont work")
          ((= G 0) "gift isn't on a rock, it wont work")) )
    (loop 
      while t
      do
       (setq I (+ I 1))
       (setq I (-(* I 2) 1))
       (setq CR 9) 
       (breadth-search CR G #'lmg-moves)
       (when (= CR G)
         (return "Let me Try!"))
       (when (> CR N)
         (return "Don't laugh at me!"))))
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There are some things that are immediately obvious:

  • You have exactly two legal return values, "Let me try!", and "Don't make fun of me!". You misspelt the first, rephrased the second, and added a lot of strings that do not have a use for the problem (are they meant as comments?).
  • The description calls the variables N and M, but your attempts take parameters N and G. Why confuse yourself? Either call them N and M, or (better) use meaningful names, like rock-number and gift-place.

Now, let's see your program structure.

(defun gift (N G)
  (setq CR 9)
  (setq i 3))

These setq instructions have undefined behaviour at this point, because CR and I are not defined yet. Many Lisp implementations will implicitly create globally special variables of these names, but it is bad style to depend on it. I have the impression that you want to use let here, like this:

(defun gift (rock-number gift-place)
  (let ((current-rock 0)
        (jump-number 0))
    ;; ...
    ))

Note that you should really start from the beginning, because you would miss the solution when the gift is on rock 1 or 4.

Next up, that cond form: it is dead code, because it has no side effects, and you throw away its return value immediately. It is thus at best a comment, and you should use a comment for that.

Finally, we have this funny loop:

(loop
  (setq I (+ I 1))
  (setq I (-(* I 2) 1))
  (setq CR 9) 
  (breadth-search CR G #'lmg-moves)
  (when (= CR G) (return "Let me Try!"))
  (when (> CR N) (return "Don't laugh at me!"))))

I don't know what breadth-search does, but it seems that you really depend on the manipulation of globally special variables. I cannot say what might happen here. However, I can see several problems:

  • You can have up to two locations when jumping a certain distance from a given rock. It cannot be right to check only a single variable after each jump.
  • You seem to confuse the jump number with its jump distance. I goes in the sequence 1, 3, 7, 15 …, but the jump number sequence would be 1, 2, 3, 4 … while the jump distance sequence would be 1, 3, 5, 7 …. Even the rocks visited when always jumping right are a different sequence (1, 4, 9, 16 …).
  • You reset CR to 9 each time through the loop. I do not see how that could be right.

Stylistically, you should keep your variables as local as possible, using for example let, do, or the extended loop keywords :for and :with, then pass them into the functions that need them as arguments. This makes it much easier to reason about what is happening.

I think that your mental model of the solution algorithm is a bit confused. I would structure this in such a way that you loop over the jumps and keep a set of rocks that you can possibly be on after exactly this number of jumps. A special treatment for small N does not seem to really give a lot of efficiency gain. If you have a proof that N > 49 always has a solution, on the other hand, you should have a guard clause and a comment that outlines the proof.

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