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I'm working on a homework assignment and I ran into a little snag.

I'm trying to read a filename from standard input and then stat the file to get the size (as per the assignment's requirements):

#define BUFFSIZE 4096

int
main(void) {
    int n;

    char buffer[BUFFSIZE];

    struct stat buf;

    while ((n = read(STDIN_FILENO, buffer, BUFFSIZE)) > 0) {
        stat(buffer, &buf);
        perror("stat");
    }
}

Here's the output when ran (I entered the filename file):

file
stat: No such file or directory

But if I try something like this:

#define BUFFSIZE 4096

int
main(void) {
    int n;

    char buffer[BUFFSIZE] = "file";

    struct stat buf;

    stat(buffer, &buf);
    perror("stat");
}

I get:

stat: Success

The file named file is in the directory that I'm running the program from.

How come there is a difference between reading in the string "file" and just initializing the array to the string "file"?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Before calling stat() print the value of buffer to standard output:

printf("[%s]\n", buffer);

It will not be what you expect as read() will not NULL terminate buffer for you. Initialise buffer before read().

Not sure why you looping on the read() as you should acquire the complete name of the file before calling stat(). If you have not been forced to use read() consider using fgets().

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Did you try printing the buffer? Most likely your read call returned a newline on the end of the string "file," and there is no file "file\n" in your directory. I would recommend using fgets instead to read the filename from the console. Use standard C input/output when you can, and only delegate to platform-specific code when there is a measurable benefit (e.g. there is no cross-platform stat function in the C standard library, and sometimes Unix I/O can measurably improve performance).

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Thanks for the advice, but the assignment requires that I use read and stat. –  amillerrhodes Feb 1 '12 at 23:39

There is a '\n' in the buffer in the 1st snippet. Take it out

buffer[strlen(buffer) - 1] = 0;
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The problem is that the read leaves the newline in the buffer, so you try to stat "file\n".

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read() may be reading too much (or not enough) on the first loop. Try printing out what it's read just before the stat() call:

printf("Read %d characters (%s)\n",n,buf);

read() is probably a bit low level for this task - I'd recommend using scanf() instead.

while ( scanf ("%s",buffer) == 1) { 

For safe code, you'll need to specify the maximum number of characters to read, which you can do like this:

while ( scanf ("%4096s",buffer) == 1) { 

However, if you want to use the BUFFSIZE macro, you'll need to do a bit of mucking about:

#define XLIM_PERCENT_S(x) "%" #x "s"
#define LIM_PERCENT_S(x) XLIM_PERCENT_S(x)  

....  

while ( scanf ( LIM_PERCENT_S( BUFFSIZE ) , buffer) == 1) { 
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