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I have a core data value that is "integer 32". How should I set/get values from this?

with

[NSNumber numberWithInteger:X]

or with

[NSNUmber numberWithInt:X] 

?

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3  
they are the same –  Danut Pralea Feb 2 '12 at 0:34
    
they are the same???? thanks. –  SpaceDog Feb 2 '12 at 0:48
4  
on 64bits machine NSInteger is long (integer 64), but on iPhone they are same –  Bryan Chen Feb 2 '12 at 0:52
1  
Now that iPhone is 64 bit as well, is this answer still the same? –  SAHM Nov 4 '13 at 10:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

NSInteger is simply a typedef for int, so you don't lose/gain integer precision one way or another. Both will work.

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thanksssssssssssssss! –  SpaceDog Feb 2 '12 at 0:48
    
+1 - also, I added below how you can find out in XCode –  bryanmac Feb 2 '12 at 0:51

As Jack said, it's a typedef. To add on to the answer, here's how you find out.

In XCode, hold down Apple key with your source file open. You'll see NSInteger become a link. After clicking on it, it will open it's definition.

#if __LP64__ || (TARGET_OS_EMBEDDED && !TARGET_OS_IPHONE) || TARGET_OS_WIN32 ||      NS_BUILD_32_LIKE_64
typedef long NSInteger;
typedef unsigned long NSUInteger;
#else
typedef int NSInteger;
typedef unsigned int NSUInteger;
#endif

Also, xlc0212's point is a good one. If you read the definition above, it's pretty clear.

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+1 This is one of the most awesome Xcode features ever. So nice for quickly looking at public methods/properties. –  Jack Lawrence Feb 2 '12 at 1:09

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