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I am very new to Java generics and have spent an exorbitant amount of time looking for an appropriate solution (if any).

I'm trying to design adapters that handle objects of a specific type of class. As described below, the CAdapter class handles "CClass" objects only. I am trying to provide an abstract generic adapter that handles the bulk of the work (much like Java collections such as LinkedList). I then provide a concrete adapter implementation for each type that needs to be supported.

// Classes

public interface AInterface {
  public String toString();
}

public class BClass extends AInterface  {
  public String toString() { return "BClass "; }
}

public class CClass extends AInterface  {
  public String toString() { return "CClass"; }
}

// Adapters

public interface AdapterInterface<T extends AInterface> {
  public T getInterface();
}

public class BAdapter implements AdapterInterface<BClass> {
  private BClass aInterface = null;
  public BClass getInterface() { return aInterface; }
}

public class CAdapter implements AdapterInterface<CClass> {
  private CClass aInterface = null;
  public CClass getInterface() { return aInterface; }
}

Firstly, I have read that providing a CONCRETE implementation for such a generic adapter is frowned upon (something about God killing a kitten)! Maybe somebody could expand on this?

Secondly, I have run into an issue with dynamically instantiating an adapter and not having the Java compiler complain. For example, I have the method:

public <T extends AInterface> AdapterInterface<T> getAdapter(String type) {
  AdapterInterface<T> result = null;
  if (type.equals("C") {
    result = new CAdapter();
  }
  return result;
}

Of course, the compiler will complain about CAdapter not matching . Given any type of AInterface object I would like to be able to load the right adapter and process it appropriately. I am failing to understand the factory pattern in order to accomplish this.

Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated.

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Are you calling foo.<CAdapter> getAdapter(C)? Otherwise the T is unbound. A more common pattern would be public AdapterInterface<T> getAdapter(Class<T> clazz); –  Nialscorva Feb 2 '12 at 1:03
    
You'll have to give some context to the kitten killing part. We can't tell you if Some Guy On The Internet is right or wrong if we don't know what he actually said. –  millimoose Feb 2 '12 at 1:05
    
@Nialscorva It doesn't really matter. The type system can't prove the constraint whether you provide a type token or not. Type tokens are useful when the method signature something like <T> T getWhateverOfType(Class<T> type) because of Class.newInstance(), Class.cast() et al. They're not useful if you're not dealing with instances of the given class. –  millimoose Feb 2 '12 at 1:06
    
@Nialscorva I.e. what would help here is if you could pass AdapterInterface<CClass>.class to the method parameter, but that's impossible without super type tokens. (And I don't think they'd actually help here problem anyway, not with making the code typesafe statically.) –  millimoose Feb 2 '12 at 1:10
2  
when I see code like in AdapterInterface, first thing I do is open in my browser Langer's Generics FAQ –  gnat Feb 2 '12 at 18:43
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

My answer is a bit superfluous, but:

Anything with a <T> means "my caller knows what this type is, but I don't". So

AdapterInterface<T> result = null;

Means "I don't actually know what type result is, it's whatever my caller thinks it is". The compiler complains about this:

result = new CAdapter();

Because the this code can't assume that T is CClass.

In fact, there is no way to do this without a cast (declaring the method wild carded just means that you need to cast the result where you call it). The cast is your way of telling the compiler "I know that you have no way of knowing what this is, that's ok: I do. Trust me. Chill.". Yes, you'll get a warning. And that's ok.

Generics don't eliminate all casting, but they allow you to do it just once. Instead of needing casts all over the place, you need them at just that one spot where you - the coder - know for sure that you are playing games with types. All the rest of the code, the suff that uses the adapter you have just created, can safely work with the generic type.

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Thanks for your answer. I appreciate that it was very clearly explained. –  Michael Cronk Feb 3 '12 at 20:08
    
I'm stealing the phrasing "my caller knows what this type is, but I don't", it makes things much clearer than how I tend to explain this. –  millimoose Feb 4 '12 at 14:49
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Don't use generics here, covariant (or contravariant, can never remember which is which) return types seem to do what you want:

interface AdapterInterface {
    public AInterface getInterface();
}

class BAdapter implements AdapterInterface {
    private BClass aInterface = null;

    public BClass getInterface() {
        return aInterface;
    }
}

class CAdapter implements AdapterInterface {
    private CClass aInterface = null;

    public CClass getInterface() {
        return aInterface;
    }
}

public AdapterInterface getAdapter(String type) {
    AdapterInterface result = null;
    if (type.equals("C")) {
        result = new CAdapter();
    }
    return result;
}

Unless there's some other methods in the interfaces you didn't mention. The following also compiles with the classes being generic:

public
AdapterInterface<? extends AInterface> getAdapter(String type) {
    if (type.equals("C")) {
        return new CAdapter();
    } else {
        // …
    }
}

The reason your original method won't compile is that T is some specific unknown type that extends AInterface; it doesn't mean "any type that extends from AInterface". It isn't possible to statically prove that the adapter you return is an adapter for the type the caller wanted.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your input. Between your answer and the one below (PaulMurrayCbr) I think I have finally grasped how do go about handling Java generics - particularly when utilizing the factory design pattern. I will simply perform a single cast in the factory and suppress the warning, understanding that generics (at least with Java 5/6) cannot eliminate all casting. –  Michael Cronk Feb 3 '12 at 20:07
    
@MichaelCronk That's right. A good deal of SO questions on Java's generics actually tend to be the OP asking how to implement the type constraint he's thinking of only to find out why it's not possible. What you can and should do, however, is try to avoid unchecked casts (casts to type parameters and parameterised types) as much as possible, by replacing them with Class.cast() and other runtime type checks. Or encapsulate them as narrowly as possible in code you know is correct even if the type system can't verify it. –  millimoose Feb 3 '12 at 21:46
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