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I am currently trying to write an algorithm that determines how many bits are necessary to represent a number x. My implementation will be in c. There are a few catches though, I am restricted to pretty much just the bitwise operators {~, &, ^, |, +, <<, >>}. Also, I cannot use any type of control flow (if, while, for). My original approach was to examine the number in binary from left to right, and look for where there is an occurrence of the first '1'. I am not sure how to approach this given the restrictions I have. The number I am working with can be considered an unsigned integer. So 00110 would require only 3 bits.

I am wondering if there is a much easier/cleaner way to do this and I am missing it? Or if someone can give a few hints?

Basically, I was trying to implement this without the while loop:

 int result = 0;
  while (x >>= 1) {
    result += 1;
  }
  return result;
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2  
Is it a homework? –  shadyabhi Feb 2 '12 at 1:03
    
Is the number an integer or floating point? What are the maximum and minimum values? Signed or unsigned? –  Adam Liss Feb 2 '12 at 1:03
    
@AbhijeetRastogi: Yes, it is one of the last "puzzles" I am solving for a computer architecture course. I have all types of problems like this that involve bit manipulation, I am currently about 80% of the way and this is one of the last problems that I really can't seem to get started on. –  Chris Dargis Feb 2 '12 at 1:09
    
@AdamLiss: The number is interpreted as an unsigned integer. –  Chris Dargis Feb 2 '12 at 1:10

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

http://www-graphics.stanford.edu/~seander/bithacks.html#IntegerLog

Shows how to do it without control flow.

unsigned int v;          // 32-bit value to find the log2 of 
register unsigned int r; // result of log2(v) will go here
register unsigned int shift;

r =     (v > 0xFFFF) << 4; v >>= r;
shift = (v > 0xFF  ) << 3; v >>= shift; r |= shift;
shift = (v > 0xF   ) << 2; v >>= shift; r |= shift;
shift = (v > 0x3   ) << 1; v >>= shift; r |= shift;
                                        r |= (v >> 1);
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If you want to look more "l33t": number>>=1. :) –  Matteo Italia Feb 2 '12 at 1:05
1  
Please note, he wrote I cannot use any type of control flow. –  shadyabhi Feb 2 '12 at 1:05
1  
The post says no control flow, which I assume means no while loops –  TJD Feb 2 '12 at 1:05
1  
unrolling a loop means its not a loop :) ie, no branching :) –  Keith Nicholas Feb 2 '12 at 9:36
1  
@AntoineMathys this isn't assembly, but many assemblers can do this comparison and then get the value of the comparison without branching. Note in this case it only needs the flag state to carry on, it doesn't branch on the result. (though a compiler might decide to branch if it thinks its more efficient). But either way, the question is about C, and he would of accepted it because when he would of looked up the < operator he'd of found its not a conditional and isn't a control flow, so is an acceptable answer –  Keith Nicholas Feb 9 '12 at 18:31

Accepted answer is actually wrong: e.g. it outputs 5 for 32..63 (instead of 6), 4 for 16..31 (instead of 5). It's like taking the base 2 logarithm and rounding down.

The correct solution is as follows:

unsigned int v;          // 32-bit value to find the log2 of 
register unsigned int r; // result of log2(v) will go here
register unsigned int shift;

r =     (v > 0xFFFF) << 4; v >>= r;
shift = (v > 0xFF  ) << 3; v >>= shift; r |= shift;
shift = (v > 0xF   ) << 2; v >>= shift; r |= shift;
shift = (v > 0x3   ) << 1; v >>= shift; r |= shift;
                                        r |= (v >> 1);
r++;

Note the r++.

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Please try:

// http://www.cs.northwestern.edu/~wms128/bits.c
int check_bits_fit_in_2s_complement(signed int x, unsigned int n) {
  int mask = x >> 31;

  return !(((~x & mask) + (x & ~mask))>> (n + ~0));
}
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Well, I think he needs a first-bit-counter rather than last-bit-counter. Since this algorithm imply 32bit integer, there's fixing needed by the result.

unsigned int v;          // 32-bit value to find the log2 of 
register unsigned int r; // result of log2(v) will go here
register unsigned int shift;

r =     (v > 0xFFFF) << 4; v >>= r;
shift = (v > 0xFF  ) << 3; v >>= shift; r |= shift;
shift = (v > 0xF   ) << 2; v >>= shift; r |= shift;
shift = (v > 0x3   ) << 1; v >>= shift; r |= shift;
                                        r |= (v >> 1);
return 32-r;
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I have a solution. It is not fast. It calculates the number of bits needed, i.e. 32 for 0xFFFFFFFF and 0 for 0x00000000. Note that your C code really calculates the most significant bit or zero.

Here it is:

#define ISSET(x,i) ((x & (1 << i)) >> i)
#define FILL(x) ((x << 5) | (x << 4) | (x << 3) | (x << 2) | (x << 1) | x)
#define IF(x,y,z) ((FILL(x) & y) | (~FILL(x) & z))
#define R(x,i,y,z) (IF(ISSET(x,i),y,z))

int log2 (uint32_t x)
{
  return  R(x,31,32,
          R(x,30,31,
          R(x,29,30,
          R(x,28,29,
          R(x,27,28,
          R(x,26,27,
          R(x,25,26,
          R(x,24,25,
          R(x,23,24,
          R(x,22,23,
          R(x,21,22,
          R(x,20,21,
          R(x,19,20,
          R(x,18,19,
          R(x,17,18,
          R(x,16,17,
          R(x,15,16,
          R(x,14,15,
          R(x,13,14,
          R(x,12,13,
          R(x,11,12,
          R(x,10,11,
          R(x, 9,10,
          R(x, 8, 9,
          R(x, 7, 8,
          R(x, 6, 7,
          R(x, 5, 6,
          R(x, 4, 5,
          R(x, 3, 4,
          R(x, 2, 3,
          R(x, 1, 2,
          R(x, 0, 1, 0))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))));
}

Note: FILL should be extended although in this case 6 bits suffice to represent the highest return value (32).

Note: The general principle can be used for other functions.

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