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I am trying to parse a generated ARFF file using Python 3.2. Currently, I am trying to write a regular expression that will read a line structured like

@attribute sepallength {'\'(-inf-5.55]\'','\'(5.55-6.15]\'','\'(6.15-inf)\''}

and returns a MatchObject whose groups() function returns

("sepallength", "'\\'(-inf-5.55]\\''", "'\\'(5.55-6.15]\\''", "'\\'(6.15-inf)\\''")

In other words, I am trying to write a regular expression that will match one or more substrings that follow a certain format.

My current attempt looks like this (line is a string):

matches = re.match(r"@attribute (\w+) {(?:([^,]+),?)+}", line)

But its group() function returns only the last substring that matches the pattern within the curly braces:

('sepallength', "'\\'(6.15-inf)\\''")

Why is the second plus symbol not making the expression match every instance that satisfies the not-a-comma rule I have written? How can I easily get the values I want?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The answer to your question

Why is the second plus symbol not making the expression match every instance that satisfies the not-a-comma rule I have written?

is at least documented in section Match Objects:

If a group matches multiple times, only the last match is accessible

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"It can't be done" is the correct answer v_v –  sadakatsu Apr 24 '14 at 5:26

I think you are looking for findall http://docs.python.org/library/re.html#re.findall

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I can't see a way to make findall() work. If I were just looking for something like alphanumeric sequences, it would be great, but I am specifically looking for comma-delineated non-comma strings that are necessarily surrounded by curly braces. In addition, I want to grab the attribute's name (e.g., 'sepallength') at the same time. Can findall() be applied to this problem? –  sadakatsu Feb 2 '12 at 1:52
    
Hum, sounds complicated. I think you would instead be better served by breaking down the problem with a function that does multipule steps. 1) Read the line 2) Get the the "sepalllength" 3) Get everything between the {} and split(',') –  Robert Peters Feb 2 '12 at 2:03
    
I am currently working with a similar solution just to get moving along. However, doesn't the concept of regular expressions allow for the idea of multiple substring matches? And, if so, does the Python representation of regexes support it? –  sadakatsu Feb 2 '12 at 2:09
    
yes it does, but I think you're mixing up matching more then on in the regex vs having a regex that matches once but you use re.findall(regex, subject). –  Robert Peters Feb 2 '12 at 2:28

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