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I know that you can declare a C function outside of a class, but is it possible to declare a Objective-C method outside of a class?

Example:

// Works
void printHelloC()
{
    NSLog(@"Hello.");
}

// Error
-(void) printHelloOC
{
    NSLog(@"Hello.");
}

int main (int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    @autoreleasepool {
        printHelloC();
        [self printHelloOC];// 'self' obviously would not work but you get the idea
    }
    return 0;
}
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5 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

A method without an associated class is a meaningless concept. Functions, as you've noted, are just fine.

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5  
Not necessarily true. You could have a selector that performs specific code independent of what the object is, as long as it does a certain task. That's the reasoning behind protocols. –  Richard J. Ross III Feb 2 '12 at 1:52
    
@RichardJ.RossIII - to do what you describe surely you define a category on NSObject? –  CRD Feb 2 '12 at 5:19
    
@CRD not necessarily, you can do the same thing with method addition (see my answer). Which basically is a more complex way of doing what a category does. –  Richard J. Ross III Feb 2 '12 at 12:39
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It depends. You can do something similar with method adding at runtime:

#import <objc/runtime.h>

void myCustomMethod(id self, SEL _cmd, id arg1, id arg2)
{
    NSLog(@"This is a test, arg1: %@, arg2: %@", arg1, arg2);
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    Class NSObjClass = [NSObject class];

    class_addMethod(NSObjClass, @selector(myNewMethod::), (IMP) myCustomMethod, "v@:@@");

    NSObject myObject = [NSObject new];

    [myObject myNewMethod:@"Hi" :@"There"];

    [myObject release];

    return 0;
}

But that is about it outside of a @class construct, and it really just covers up what happens with a category.

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Good answer, but your method name is a bit of a misnomer, since it is actually a method not a selector –  dreamlax Feb 2 '12 at 5:53
    
@dreamlax good point, fixed –  Richard J. Ross III Feb 2 '12 at 12:40
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You can use a category for this.

As an instance method:

@interface NSObject (MONStuff)
- (void)printHelloOC;
@end

@implementation NSObject (MONStuff)
- (void)printHelloOC
{
  NSLog(@"Hello.");
}
@end

// in use:

NSObject * obj = ...;
[obj printHelloOC];

As a Class method:

@interface NSObject (MONStuff)
+ (void)printHelloOC;
@end

@implementation NSObject (MONStuff)
+ (void)printHelloOC
{
  NSLog(@"Hello.");
}
@end

// in use:

[NSObject printHelloOC];

Of course, you must associate that with a class - so it's not exactly the same as you posted, but it's a close definition + declaration separate from the formal class declaration.

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A category simply extends a class - by definition any methods declared in the category are in a class... –  Carl Norum Feb 2 '12 at 1:44
    
@Carl I expanded on it –  justin Feb 2 '12 at 1:45
    
Your new method is an NSString method. That's not outside a class - that's inside NSString! –  Carl Norum Feb 2 '12 at 1:46
1  
+1. Categories extend the class with methods written outside the class. That's the whole purpose of using categories, after all! –  Alex Reynolds Feb 2 '12 at 1:49
    
That's true, but it's not what the OP is asking. –  Carl Norum Feb 2 '12 at 1:53
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Objective c functions are always associated with a class. If you mean you want to use an objective-c function without instantiating a class, you can of course write a class method (notice the plus sign instead of the usual hyphen)

@interface Test

+ (void)aClassMethod;

@end

then you can call it by calling

[Test aClassMethod];
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2  
Not always true. If you use method swizzling for example, you can add a function to multiple classes with multiple selectors! –  Richard J. Ross III Feb 2 '12 at 1:50
    
Perhaps... but method swizzling is a pretty advanced concept, and definitely not something that you should without careful consideration. –  futureelite7 Feb 2 '12 at 2:44
    
It isn't that complex, you simply include the runtime, create your function, and add the method to the class with a selector. It doesn't take a rocket scientist to do, and swapping method implementations is just as easy. –  Richard J. Ross III Feb 2 '12 at 12:42
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No, it is not possible - you will need to either use global C functions or class (+) methods.

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1  
It is possible, the Objective-C runtime allows you to add methods to a class even while the program is executing. It even allows you to create whole new classes. You can define an Objective-C method implementation and then associate that method with a class and a selector. –  dreamlax Feb 2 '12 at 6:38
    
Yes, it is indeed possible to create classes dynamically. It is not the question, however. The question is whether it is possible to define and execute Objective-C methods a-la global C functions (or, say, globally scoped JavaScript closures). It is not possible. Objective-C methods must be defined as part of a class (class or instance scoped). –  Roman K Feb 2 '12 at 19:22
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