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This morning I realized how much of a hassle it is for me to have to install JDK and setup my path for GCC on every computer I have to use. I was wondering if there's a way I can just throw my JDK in my Eclipse folder and run it portably?

Also, I setup my Eclipse to do C++ and was wondering if I can get away with compiling without having to set that up in my path (for the same reasons previously stated).

I assume the latter isn't possible (or at least easily possible) but I don't know about the Java side.

EDIT: Oh, I've looked at the Preferences>Java>Installed JREs option but it doesn't seem like that's what I want, because that would mean the JDK isn't needed, right?

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"Preferences>Java>Installed JREs" is completely unrelated. It is used to configure what JVM (version) your programs run against. –  eternaln00b Feb 2 '12 at 1:59
    
Okay, thanks.... –  BackpackOnHead Feb 2 '12 at 2:01

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

The Preferences>Java>Installed JREs does allow you to set the path to the JDK that you want to use. To retain preferences across workspaces: Whenever you close eclipse all of the data about your setup is saved to a .metadata file in your workspace. By copying the .metadata file to the location that you are creating a new workspace your settings will come along with. This can keep many of your preferences in tact but will also assume that you have the same source files and editors open in the new workspace. I have a copy of my .metadata file that has all of the project specific stuff cleaned out.

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I'm not sure if this worked. Need to test on another computer first. –  BackpackOnHead Feb 2 '12 at 18:19

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