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n00b question alert! here is the problem: I am creating a shell script that takes a minimum of 3 arguments: a string, a line number, and at least one file.

I've written a script that will accept EXACTLY 3 arguments, but I don't know how to handle multiple file name arguments.

here's the relevant parts of my code (skipping the writing back into the file etc):

#!/usr/bin/env ruby

the_string = ARGV[0] 
line_number = ARGV[1]
the_file = ARGV[2] 

def insert_script(str, line_n, file)
  f = file
  s = str
  ln = line_n.to_i

  if (File.file? f)
    read_in(f,ln,s)
  else 
    puts "false"
  end
end

def read_in(f,ln,s)
  lines = File.readlines(f)
  lines[ln] = s + "\n"
  return lines
end

# run it
puts insert_script(the_string, line_number, the_file)

now I know that it's easy to write a block that will iterate through ALL the arguments:

ARGV.each do |a|
   puts a 
end

but I need to ONLY loop through the args from ARGV[2] (the first file name) to the last file name.

I know there's got to be - at a minimum - at least one easy way to do this, but I just can't see what it is at the moment!

in any case - I'd be more than happy if someone can just point me to a tutorial or an example, I'm sure there are plenty out there - but I can't seem to find them.

thanks

share|improve this question
    
great answers from everyone! thanks everyone. it's not usually the case that I understand or can use many of the answers I get here - so either I'm getting smarter or this was a particularly easy question or you guys are just good explainers... or some combo of all three! cheers, B –  Bennett Von Bennett Feb 3 '12 at 6:56

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you modify the ARGV array to remove the elements you're no longer interested in treating as filenames, you can treat all remaining elements as filenames and iterate over their contents with ARGF.

That's a mouthful, a small example will demonstrate it more easily:

argf.rb:

#!/usr/bin/ruby

str = ARGV.shift
line = ARGV.shift

ARGF.each do |f|
    puts f
end
$ ./argf.rb one two argf.rb argf.rb 
#!/usr/bin/ruby

str = ARGV.shift
line = ARGV.shift

ARGF.each do |f|
    puts f
end
#!/usr/bin/ruby

str = ARGV.shift
line = ARGV.shift

ARGF.each do |f|
    puts f
end
$ 

There are two copies of the argf.rb file printed to the console because I gave the filename argf.rb twice on the command line. It was opened and iterated over once for each mention.

If you want to operate on the files as files, rather than read their contents, you can simply modify the ARGV array and then use the remaining elements directly.

share|improve this answer
    
that is perfect - exactly what I was looking for and easily grasped by my n00bie brain. thanks much! –  Bennett Von Bennett Feb 3 '12 at 6:49

Would you consider using a helpful gem? Trollop is great for command line parsing because it automatically gives you help messages, long and short command-line switches, etc.

require 'trollop'

opts = Trollop::options do
  opt :string, "The string", :type => :string
  opt :line, "line number", :type => :int
  opt :file, "file(s)", :type => :strings
end

p opts 

When I call it "commandline.rb" and run it:

$ ruby commandline.rb --string "foo bar" --line 3 --file foo.txt bar.txt

{:string=>"foo bar", :line=>3, :file=>["foo.txt", "bar.txt"], :help=>false, :string_given=>true, :line_given=>true, :file_given=>true}
share|improve this answer
    
hmmm... I will check that out - thanks Mark! –  Bennett Von Bennett Feb 3 '12 at 6:51

The canonical way is to use shift, like so:

the_string = ARGV.shift
line_number = ARGV.shift
ARGV.each do |file|
  puts insert_script(the_string, line_number, the_file)
end
share|improve this answer
    
thanks dave, appreciate it. –  Bennett Von Bennett Feb 3 '12 at 6:50

Take a look at OptionParser - http://ruby-doc.org/stdlib-1.9.3/libdoc/optparse/rdoc/OptionParser.html. It allows you to specify the number of arguments, whether they are mandatory or optional, handle errors such as MissingArgument or InvalidOption.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks Sergey - I did come across OptionParser, but found it a bit intimidating... probably extremely powerful I'm sure, but I was looking for the exact type of solution sarnold suggested. –  Bennett Von Bennett Feb 3 '12 at 6:49

An alternate (and somewhat uglier) trick if you don't want to use another library or change the ARGV array is to use .upto

2.upto(ARGV.length-1) do |i|
    puts ARGV[i]
end
share|improve this answer
    
thanks Retief - a friend of mine and I came up with this strategy tonight, but not as elegant... more along the lines of (in pseudo-code): 'for 2 to length-1 do...' etc this is more concise - so cheers. –  Bennett Von Bennett Feb 3 '12 at 6:54

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