Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've created a program that takes an inputted string and outputs the string backwards. I've created a function that counts the number of characters in a string. With that information, I've created another function that puts the first character of the original array at the end of the new array. Thus, when the loop in the function has finished, the new array contains the letters of the original array but backwards. I'm running into some difficulty however. I'm still wary of character arrays and I'm not sure if I'm using them correctly. Could someone help me out?

#include <stdio.h>

#define MAXLINE 1000

char backward(char str[], int count)
int count(char str[])

int main() {
    char orig[MAXLINE];
    int c;

    scanf("%s", orig);
    c = count(orig);
    printf("%s", backward(orig, c));

    return 0;
}

char backward(char str[], int count) {
    char back[MAXLINE];
    int i;

    for(i = 0; i <= count; ++i) {
        back[count] = str[i];
        --count;

    return back;
}

int count(char str[]) {
    int i;

    for (i = 0; str[i] != '\0'; ++i)
        ;

    return i;
}

Edit: Input: Let's say "minivan". Expected output would be "navinim". There's no actual output yet. I'm getting this error:

palindrome.c:8: error: expected ‘=’, ‘,’, ‘;’, ‘asm’ or ‘__attribute__’ before ‘int’
share|improve this question
    
Could you please give the input, expected output and actual output of this program? –  David Grayson Feb 2 '12 at 2:23
1  
What exactly is the problem you're having? Also, please take a few minutes to read this meta post. I'd suspect if you don't, you may stop getting help here pretty soon. Thanks. :) –  Ken White Feb 2 '12 at 2:25
1  
pass your parameters by reference "&" and make sure to return the array not just a char. try compiling this first. –  L7ColWinters Feb 2 '12 at 2:26
2  
You are missing semicolons (;) after declarations of backward and count. –  Banthar Feb 2 '12 at 2:28
    
Now a real challenge would to write code to detect palindromes that is, itself, a palindrome! :P –  Jack Maney Feb 2 '12 at 2:31

5 Answers 5

The error you're getting is because your prototypes are wrong:

#include <stdio.h>

#define MAXLINE 1000

char backward(char str[], int count)  /* missing ; */
int count(char str[])                 /* missing ; */

int main() {

You should also consider replacing count() with strlen(3) from the <string.h> header file. The standard library is full of utilities that have been debugged and known to work well -- it is worth using them. (Yes, there's educational value in re-implementing them. But in that case, be prepared to test with a variety of corner cases.)

share|improve this answer

Your code probably won't compile because you missed a closing brace in backward().

char backward(char str[], int count) {
    char back[MAXLINE];
    int i;

    for(i = 0; i <= count; ++i) {
        back[count] = str[i];
        --count;
    /** You should add a } character here! **/

    return back;
}

MAJOR EDIT 1:

I tried to compile your code and there were lots of things wrong with it. Here is working code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

#define MAXLINE 1000

char * backward(char * str);

int main() {
  char orig[MAXLINE];
  int c;

  scanf("%s", orig);
  printf("%s\n", backward(orig));

  return 0;
}

char * backward(char * str) {
  int count = strlen(str);
  char * back = malloc(MAXLINE);
  int i;
  for(i = 0; i < count; i++)
  {
    back[count-i-1] = str[i];
  }
  back[count] = 0; // Add the null termination character.
  return back;
}

When I run this code and enter "abcde", it outputs "edcba". Let me know if you have any specific questions about how this works. I got rid of your count() function because it is a duplicate of strlen(), and I moved the call to strlen() inside the backward() to make the interface to the backward() function simpler.

Another thing that made your code fail is that you were decrementing count inside the for loop, which would cause your for loop to terminate earlier than you wanted it to.

share|improve this answer
    
@L7ColWinters, why the -1? I'm just realizing now this answer is kind of incomplete, but at least it points out one reason the OP is having trouble. –  David Grayson Feb 2 '12 at 2:30
    
@l7Col: I disagree -- when the error is a compile error, pointing out the flaws in answers makes perfect sense. –  sarnold Feb 2 '12 at 2:33

This line has an off by one mistake:

back[count] = str[i];

count is not the last character of the string, it's the '\0' character.

Also you are returning a stack variable - this is not going to work.

You should reverse the string in place:

for(i = 0; i <= count; ++i) {
    --count;
    char tmp = str[i];
    str[i] = str[count];
    str[count] = tmp;
}

You can then return str.

share|improve this answer
    
back[count - 1]? –  user1064913 Feb 2 '12 at 2:26
    
@user1064913 back[--count] = str[i]; would be better, but it does not matter: your code is not going to work, because back is allocated on the stack. You should reverse the string in place. –  dasblinkenlight Feb 2 '12 at 2:28
    
What would be a solution? –  user1064913 Feb 2 '12 at 2:36
    
@user1064913 I've updated the answer. –  dasblinkenlight Feb 2 '12 at 2:43

You program have lot of errors. Firstly you have missed out semicolons(;) while declaring the prototypes for backward and count. Then you haven't closed the for loop in backward function with ending braces(}). But the biggest three problems are 1. You have defined backward function as a char data type but you are returning a pointer to the array of char data type 2. You are accessing back[count] instead of back[count-1]. Suppose the string is minivan. The count will hold 7. the last character is at 6th position not 7th because in array subscripts starts with 0 not 1. And back[count] will point to null character i.e '\0' 3. You are incrementing i and decrementing count and checking i<=count. This will process your string only till mid of it.

Although the right program has been posted by David Greyson, but since he have removed the count function and introduced the strlen and malloc function, I am posting your program again by just correcting your algorithm

#include <stdio.h>

#define MAXLINE 1000

char *backward(char str[], int count);
int count(char str[]);

int main() {
    char orig[MAXLINE];
    int c;

    scanf("%s", orig);
    c = count(orig);
    printf("%s", backward(orig, c));

    return 0;
}

char *backward(char str[], int count) {
    char back[MAXLINE];
    int i;

    for(i = 0; i < count; ++i) {
        back[count-i-1] = str[i];
    }
    back[i] = '\0';
    return back;
}

int count(char str[]) {
    int i;

    for (i = 0; str[i] != '\0'; ++i)
        ;

    return i;
}
share|improve this answer

You can create a character pointer then add length of string to this pointer, it should likely char *reverse = (char *)name, then add reverse = reverse + strlen(name) -1.

Then you can use while loop through through the start of string. The whole code looks,

void main(void)
{
    char *name = "Kernel";
    char *reverse = (char *)name;
    reverse = reverse + strlen(name) - 1;
    while(*reverse)
        printf("%c", *reverse);
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.