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In the following code I'm using the CancellationToken to wake up the GetConsumingEnumerable() when the producer is not producing and I want to break out of the foreach and exit the Task. But I dont see IsCancellationRequested being logged and my Task.Wait(timeOut) waits for the full timeOut period. What am I doing wrong?

userToken.Task = Task.Factory.StartNew(state =>
{
    userToken.CancelToken = new CancellationTokenSource();

    foreach (var broadcast in userToken.BroadcastQueue.GetConsumingEnumerable(userToken.CancelToken.Token))
    {
        if (userToken.CancelToken.IsCancellationRequested)
        {
            Log.Write("BroadcastQueue IsCancellationRequested");
            break;
            ...
        }
    }

    return 0;
}, "TaskSubscribe", TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning);

later...

UserToken.CancelToken.Cancel();          
try
{
    task.Wait(timeOut);
}
catch (AggregateException ar)
{
    Log.Write("AggregateException " + ar.InnerException, MsgType.InfoMsg);
}
catch (OperationCanceledException)
{
    Log.Write("BroadcastQueue Cancelled", MsgType.InfoMsg);
}
share|improve this question
    
Is your first snippet being run from an anonymous method? –  M.Babcock Feb 2 '12 at 3:25
    
yes I think it is –  Spud Feb 2 '12 at 4:15
    
I've run into similar problems when implementing a ThreadStart delegate. My solution was to set the local property as static (which is bad practice I know, but it worked). That doesn't appear to be an option in your case so I'm interested in reading your answers. –  M.Babcock Feb 2 '12 at 4:18
    
Well I refactored the code to use a function rather than an anonymous function and the cancel is working. Task start now looks like this userToken.Task = Task.Factory.StartNew(state => SubscribeTask(userToken, receiveSendEventArgs, request, tokenId), "TaskSubscribe", TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning); –  Spud Feb 3 '12 at 5:17
    
I started a bounty to help drive a definitive answer for the cause. The behavior we both have seen so far makes no sense. Hopefully someone will be able to elaborate. –  M.Babcock Feb 4 '12 at 3:23

2 Answers 2

You could use CompleteAdding() which signifies that no more items will be added to the collection. If GetConsumingEnumerable is used, the foreach will end gracefully as it will know there no point in waiting for more items.

Basically once you have finished adding items to the BlockingCollection just do: myBlockingCollection.CompleteAdding()

Any threads which are doing a foreach loop with GetConsumingEnumerable will stop looping.

share|improve this answer
    
I am using CompleteAdding() in the producer thread but if no items are being added the producer thread is blocked. The Cancellation token timeout on the consumer thread is saying "I haven't heard from the producer for a long time so I'm cancelling myself". I don't know if this is a bad pattern as there seems to be an implicit rule that the producer owns the queue but we've been given cancellation on the consumer so I'm trying to do it from both ends –  Spud Oct 25 '12 at 1:26

I've created quick prototype, and it seems work for me.

Note Thread.Sleep(1000) right before token cancel request. It is possible that you are creating a race condition for Token variable, since you create and access item.CancelToken variable in different threads.

E.g. the code that is intended to cancel task might invoke cancel on wrong (previous or null) cancellation token.

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    CancellationTokenSource token = null;
    BlockingCollection<string> coll = new BlockingCollection<string>();
    var t = Task.Factory.StartNew(state =>
    {
        token = new CancellationTokenSource();
        try
        {
            foreach (var broadcast in coll.GetConsumingEnumerable(token.Token))
            {
                if (token.IsCancellationRequested)
                {
                    return;
                }
            }
        }
        catch (OperationCanceledException)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Cancel");
            return;
        }
    }, "TaskSubscribe", TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning);
    Thread.Sleep(1000);
    token.Cancel();
    t.Wait();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Now move your anonymous method to a standalone method. Is the Thread.Sleep still necessary? If not, why? –  M.Babcock Feb 4 '12 at 4:20
    
Yes, it would be still necessarily (and it's smelly code), To get rid of it you would need to move new CancellationTokenSource() somewhere, before task creation. –  Valera Kolupaev Feb 4 '12 at 4:25
    
Then it doesn't answer the question. The OP was able to solve their problem by moving the anonymous method into a non-anonymous one. The question is why? –  M.Babcock Feb 4 '12 at 4:27
1  
Hm, that really weird. The only way that problems make scene to me, it is hidden race condition. It's possible that you had masked it, by wrapping cancel/wait into the task. That may have postponed the execution (and made race-condition less frequent) or reduced degree of parallelism by sharing the same thread pool with concurrent task. I've spent plenty of time looking trough BlockingQueue source code, and it seems rock-solid to me. –  Valera Kolupaev Feb 6 '12 at 14:37
1  
I'll award the bounty to you because (besides being the only answer) you stuck with @Spud through the problem. In the end our problems ended up being much different so it's 150 rep for something I could care less about. Lesson learned I suppose. –  M.Babcock Feb 7 '12 at 0:45

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